Charging electric vehicles

discomatt

Well-Known Member

shanegtr

Well-Known Member
4 as things progress living costs and tax will increase massively , driverless cars will become a normal so to save on travel expenses many or most will not even own a vehicle, if you want to go anywhere a driverless car will pull up, pick you up and drop you off at your destination then it will go and pick up its next passenger. Ownership and uninhibited travel will be a thing of the past and for the elite only
Thats one point I hope doesn't happen. But I guess Im a minority that actually likes driving
 

CaptainBanana

Well-Known Member
just a thought but why isn’t the exterior of a EV a solar panel? Could be getting a bit of a top up whilst you are parked and getting a bit of extra juice while you are driving
Actually I can think of at least one that is but realistically the cost of doing formed curved panels probably significantly outweighs the tiny bit of output they contribute.
 
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Hoyks

Well-Known Member
Either way, facilities didn't build themselves, they were a result of demand. Servo's sprang up all over when 110 years ago there were none and you had to order your petrol to be delivered to the chemist.

If you build it, they will come... maybe, or you might also go broke waiting.

But the electrical infrastructure is already there with excess capacity to most corners of the country (remote road houses excluded of course) and installing a charger is a pretty straight forward job, they are a big box, but there isn't much inside other than a small circuit board and some big contacts.
 

Kippie

Well-Known Member
I love driving to but I would bet within 50 years this is exactly what transport will be
Yes, I agree with you. Our dependence on ICEs and imported fuel is an extremely precarious situation. In the next 10 years more refineries will shut down due to the decreased demand for fuel as EV uptake increases. It's reasonable to expect that any refinery producing a batch of fuel for Australia (which has different properties than most other countries) will charge a premium. Fuel prices in the order of $10/litre wouldn't be unrealistic.

It's the lack of foresight and good policy that puts us in this predicament.

I am fortunate that we have two cars, one EV and one diesel clunker. The EV is for all city driving and the oiler for long distance trips. Like others on this forum I am in no rush to experiment long distance travel with the EV. It's just not worth the angst. But I fear that the oiler will become too expensive to use in the near future.
 

Albynsw

Well-Known Member
Actually I can think of at least one that is but realistically the cost of doing formed curved panels probably significantly outweighs the tiny bit of output they contribute.

There was some dude on tv last week that has developed a PV style film that looked like window tint film that he said you could put on anything
Be a bit of a game changer if they could do that.
 

Albynsw

Well-Known Member

This comment is totally wrong, there is no safe level of pollution, why do you think there is so much cancer and illness in modern society?

Yes you are right but I was talking in context to other more pressing issues we could be focusing on Here in Australia
Our pollution levels are minimal compared to other cities that have had to limit vehicles because it is so bad
 

Ranger_Scott

Active Member
As said, the biggest issue would be installing infrastructure in a lot of non-urban places that currently sell fuel, not so much in the capital cities as users will charge overnight in there houses. You'd be looking at least 2 points (one for Tesla and one for others), and ideally you'd need one to one for the number of current bowsers available now. As someone said previously, it's not like a current 5 minute job to fill up and move on and let the person behind you use the bowser.

And how long will a trip from say Sydney to Brisbane take when you have to charge for around 2 hours every 400km odd?
 

boobook

Well-Known Member
The whole thing of EV's is an exercise in madness - in most of Australia anyway. Especially Victoria.

According to the Vic Government https://www.greenvehicleguide.gov.au/

A 2019 Tesla 3 in Victoria emits 184g / km of CO2
A 2019 1.8l petrol automatic Corolla 4 door emits just 85g / km of CO2

*Driving at Tesla for about 400km, and recharging a Tesla over night for 1 night at 80KwH generates about 92Kilograms of CO2. Yep almost 100kg of CO2!!!

So what is the point? Can someone tell me why we should subsidise Tesla's in Victora? So people can show off with 0 - 100 in 4 seconds?

They pollute more AND don't pay any road taxes.

If you have an electric car, you should be forced to pay the extra 30 - 40% for 100% renewable electricity in Victoria, or you are making the situation and base load coal generation demand worse when you charge your car overnight.

Simple headlines and always pointing for government action wont fix the environment. Personal action is the quickest way to start a change. But that costs more. Get solar, get batteries, use less power and get rid of 4wd's especially old petrol V8 ones. All that costs a lot but change isn't going to come for free.

*ESC Vic figures. The new co-efficient retailers are to use in Victoria is: 1.13 kg CO2-e / kWh (kilograms of carbon dioxide equivalent emissions per kilowatt hour). This figure should be applied directly to the amount of electricity consumed by the end-user.
 
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Albynsw

Well-Known Member
298FD605-9CD5-4499-932E-AEB7067B13B2.jpeg
 

shanegtr

Well-Known Member
The whole thing of EV's is an exercise in madness - in most of Australia anyway. Especially Victoria.

According to the Vic Government https://www.greenvehicleguide.gov.au/

A 2019 Tesla 3 in Victoria emits 184g / km of CO2
A 2019 1.8l petrol automatic Corolla 4 door emits just 85g / km of CO2

*Driving at Tesla for about 400km, and recharging a Tesla over night for 1 night at 80KwH generates about 92Kilograms of CO2. Yep almost 100kg of CO2!!!

So what is the point? Can someone tell me why we should subsidise Tesla's in Victora? So people can show off with 0 - 100 in 4 seconds?

They pollute more AND don't pay any road taxes.

If you have an electric car, you should be forced to pay the extra 30 - 40% for 100% renewable electricity in Victoria, or you are making the situation and base load coal generation demand worse when you charge your car overnight.

Simple headlines and always pointing for government action wont fix the environment. Personal action is the quickest way to start a change. But that costs more. Get solar, get batteries ( which don't make any personal economic sense to me), use less power and get rid of 4wd's especially old petrol V8 ones.


*ESC Vic figures. The new co-efficient retailers are to use in Victoria is: 1.13 kg CO2-e / kWh (kilograms of carbon dioxide equivalent emissions per kilowatt hour). This figure should be applied directly to the amount of electricity consumed by the end-user.
Really does highlight the need to shift our base load power to cleaner options.
 

Kippie

Well-Known Member
The electric version of Ford's F150 is selling like hot cakes in the US. I quote:

In the USA, in just one week, more than 70,000 orders were placed for the Ford F-150 Lightning, a vehicle at polar opposites to the gas-guzzling stereotype we might associate with this segment. For context, consider that Ford sold 203,797 F-Series trucks for the first three months of 2021, so Lightning needed only seven days to account for over one third of F-Series’ quarterly sales.

It's also unlikely that they will invest in the Australian market. I quote:

Global CEO of the Blue Oval Jim Farley says since dual-cabs are so popular here, as are diesels, and Australia’s charging infrastructure is not mature – it’s hard to make a case for EVs.

 

shanegtr

Well-Known Member
and Australia’s charging infrastructure is not mature – it’s hard to make a case for EVs.
The infrastructure is jus a supply and demand issue - theres currently not much demand so bugger all infrastructure is around. As demand picks up the charging stations will follow.
 

Chatty

Well-Known Member
The infrastructure is jus a supply and demand issue - theres currently not much demand so bugger all infrastructure is around. As demand picks up the charging stations will follow.
Chickens and eggs. EVs aren't popular outside of cities because of the lack of charging infrastructure.
There's no charging infrastructure because there's no EVs outside of cities.
 
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Chatty

Well-Known Member
It's also unlikely that they will invest in the Australian market. I quote:

Global CEO of the Blue Oval Jim Farley says since dual-cabs are so popular here, as are diesels, and Australia’s charging infrastructure is not mature – it’s hard to make a case for EVs.
The major reason they won't invest in Australia is that our market is just way too small.

204,000 F trucks sold in 3 months in the US. GM actually sells more because their sales are split over 2 brands. So, let's say around 500,000 utes (pick ups) sold in the US in three months, across all brands. For the sake of simplicity, let's say 2 million utes a year.

116,000 utes sold in Australia in the last 12 months - that's around 5-6% of the US market. And to access that market they would need to invest in a lot of new tooling, crash tests, dealer support, etc, etc.

And they would no doubt be looking at the stranglehold that Toyota has on the market and realise that it's simply not worth it.

The question I would ask is, If Toyota are so great, why aren't they looking at an electric version of the Hilux?
 

boobook

Well-Known Member
The question I would ask is, If Toyota are so great, why aren't they looking at an electric version of the Hilux?

I am not sure Toyota thinks Plug in EV is the future Chatty. The CEO has said on a number of occasions that he sees Hydrogen and Hybrid as the future for cars, not plug in EV technology.

 

Kippie

Well-Known Member
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