Carrying larger spare - fouling on brake line carrier on rear diff.

John U

Well-Known Member
Howdy Earth Experts,

I upped the size of the tyres on my PX Ranger some time ago. I went from 255/70/R17 Goodyear Wrangler At's to 265/75/R16 Maxxis RAZR Mts.

The seller fitted a a second hand spare in the same size, Bridgestone MT, as the spare, which when I lined it up against the tyres on the car were pretty much the same diameter (as expected).

I haven't needed to use the spare but thought I should reacquaint myself with the process. COVID Lockdown, what else are you going to do. When mounted under the car the spare was hard up against the Hayman Reese towbar, the other side was fouling on the brake hose carrier which is attached to the rear diff.

This creates a couple of potential problems.
1. Breaking the brake hose carrier bracket. Although not great, this doesn't appear to be stressing the bracket too much. The rear of the bracket has been polished up by the movement rubbing it against the tyre.
2. The bracket wearing a hole in the tyre. - the tread in that particular location was worn down a bit but looked ok. I've done a couple of decent trips, but not heaps of corrugations. I'm guessing with large amounts of corrugations it could turn out differently and damage the tyre, possibly rendering the spare useless.

The car also has a 2 inch lift.

The only practical way I can see of resolving this clearance issue is moving the hose carrier by a small amount.

I'm wondering if others who have the same, probably what is a similar trifecta of upgrades on a PX Ranger, bigger tyre size, tow bar and lift.
Did you need to make any adjustments to fit the bigger spare?
Is the forward side of your spare rubbing? Have you checked it out?
How did you resolve the issue?
 
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John U

Well-Known Member
What is a “hose carrier”? Do you mean the bracket holding the brake lines?
Yeah, that’ll be it. Thought it was brake lines but wasn’t 100%

Picture would’ve been worth a thousand words.

Initial post updated to reflect your info CTL.
 

CTL

Well-Known Member
You could try deflating the spare to give more clearance. Would need to carry a compressor.
 

John U

Well-Known Member
Got one. Do people do this? Thought about it but thought there might be down side.
How low would be safe to carry the spare and prevent the bead from breaking?
 

CTL

Well-Known Member
I drive on the sand as low as 8 psi.
The tyre could be completely flat and the bead would not come off without pressure being applied
 

discomatt

Well-Known Member
Got one. Do people do this? Thought about it but thought there might be down side.
How low would be safe to carry the spare and prevent the bead from breaking?
Heaps of people do it, well heaps of LR owners who want a bigger tire and have no rear carrier so still keep it under the car, even deflated the bead will not fail while under the car, just air it up before putting the weight of the car on it. Although that may be more to do with LR rims but I am not going into that due to anti LR sentiment that prevails here
It would also be very easy to just move the brake line a little bit, I wouldn't leave it as is though if you plan on driving any considerable distance off road
 

Albynsw

Well-Known Member
With the bead set on the rim, I don’t know if deflating it would be enough to stop the contact. I think you would be better to relocate the line and you know you are good
 

Rusty Panels

Well-Known Member
I would have to agree with Alby. Shouldn't be hard to have the lines relocated a little higher and weld another bracket onto the diff housing to secure them to.
They usually have a steel brake line with flexible hoses at each brake drum end to allow for axle travel.
 

John U

Well-Known Member
I went from 255/70/R17 Goodyear Wrangler At's to 265/75/R16 Maxxis RAZR Mts.
Sorry, it was actually 'I went from 255/70/R16 Goodyear Wrangler At's to 265/75/R16 Maxxis RAZR Mts.'

Makes a 38mm increase in tyre diameter.

Think I'll get the line relocated. Just to remember to ensure that the new location has enough clearance for suspension movement.

Will deflate the spare until I get the job done.

Thanks for all the input everyone.
 
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cam04

Well-Known Member
For reference that tyre size fits with a factory towbar no problems. Might be something in that?
 

John U

Well-Known Member
For reference that tyre size fits with a factory towbar no problems. Might be something in that?
Edit. Would’ve thought the Hayman Reese tow bar I have would’ve been pretty close to bog standard. Maybe it isn’t.
 

cam04

Well-Known Member
Edit. Would’ve thought the Hayman Reese tow bar I have would’ve been pretty close to bog standard. Maybe it isn’t.
Most rangers come standard with a Ford towbar. The aftermarket will no doubt be offering higher clearance bars than the factory ones which are grader blades off-road. The trade off of that is being seen here.
 

John U

Well-Known Member
Pictures for completeness.

Moving the bracket looks like it might be more difficult than initially expected.

Rear of ute showing towbar profile
Rear of car.jpg


Part that was rubbing on spare. Given that rigid pipe is attached to one side of the bracket it might not be as simple to move as I thought.
Attachement to diff that was rubbing.jpg


Another angle
Bracket.JPG


And another
Bracket again.JPG


Tread damage. Only slight, but concerned how this might turn out after long sections of corrugations. Looks pretty minor at the moment. Probably been like this for about 10k kms. Excuse the dirty fingernails. Am I over thinking tis altogether?
Damage to tyre.JPG


Towbar profile. Solid bit of steel.
Side profile of the towbar.JPG


Tow model info
Towbar model details.JPG
 

Albynsw

Well-Known Member
How far do think you need to move the bracket to clear the Tyre? There is usually a bit of movement in those rigid pipes If not a brake specialist will be able to bend/ move it no problem or make up a new piece that f necessary
 
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