Bushranger Nighthawk VLI 9” lights

John U

Well-Known Member
Have only recently installed some Night Hawk VLI 9” on my PX Ranger.
I drove up to Lake Albacutya from Melbourne a couple of weeks ago. The drive ended up being half after sunset. It was mostly across the main stream of traffic, which gave me a great opportunity to check out the performance of the lights.
They were amazing. I felt like I was landing an aircraft on those back roads on the way out there.
The lights have the ability to dial the intensity up and down in 7 steps. This allowed me to find a comfortable level for every condition/situation dependent on, in town, out of town, tree cover, in the open, straight roads, turns, traffic, no traffic, signs, no signs.
The lights also have interchangeable covers (included) to change each light between spot and spread. I had one spot and one spread cover on. AWESOME.
This is the future of 4wd lighting. Coming from an off-road endurance 24hr mtb racing background, adjustable light intensity has been around for a while. After using it on the road, can only see it getting more popular for 4wding.
The adjust on the fly beam patterns are the icing on the cake. Haven’t changed these as yet but can see it being very useful, especially so when you look at the cost of buying/fitting a new light to change beam pattern as an alternative.
Well done Bushranger. A top notch product.
I’ll do a proper review with pics in the near future.
9B1F0D09-CA40-4F4D-9C3D-F0957A619599.jpeg
 

Albynsw

Well-Known Member
Nice to hear, I had a brief look at these lights as I am in the market for a new set.
Tell me do you think you will dial them down much or end up leaving them on the brightest setting?
 

John U

Well-Known Member
Nice to hear, I had a brief look at these lights as I am in the market for a new set.
Tell me do you think you will dial them down much or end up leaving them on the brightest setting?
I actually reckon about a bit over half way is the comfortable spot for getting to the tracks (Mallee, Western District).

I spent a bit of time playing with the levels on the drive. When you don't need max level it is better to go a bit lower if you can to lessen the transition when changing to low beam. The max levels don't have as marked a difference as the lower levels. That's not to say it doesn't get continually brighter.

The 2 adjustment options may seem a bit gimmicky when compared to everything else out there. I reckon that if it's something you have used you'll appreciate it. My experience with night mtbing (years worth) made me wonder why it didn't it didn't already exist in 4wding when I started doing it. Spot and spread changeability is a fantastic idea.
 

Albynsw

Well-Known Member
Nice
Lightforce have offered spot spread changeability with their covers fora number of years, a few others do as well including Stedi, apparently you lose performance from having lenses fitted but if they still perform to you requirements that is not really relevant
 

Bru9

Active Member
But they dont offer a warmer white which is important for some.
They dont hit the peripherals much which in many places is just awful without it. They dont target the sides of the vehicle for 4wding.
Do they have a proper dedicated low beam for when traffic is near by? Have you thought about cars up ahead a 100m in the wet with those levels?
Diffusing the light has been done diy and commercial since the mid late 2000s.
I have been riding all kinds of dirt bikes offroad at night and never seen the need to lower the output or reduce the intensity, usually the lights dont produce anywhere near enough to want diff levels. I usually require upwards of 4000lumens with a wide 180degree beam angle and highly diffused lux while downhilling at speeds.
The claim these are the future is highly questionable I'm affraid, light is subjective like art, and sadly many bull bar mounts on newer cars are weaker and cause lights to Bob up and down badly, imo smaller light bars are better for many.
Every man and his dog all praise their lights in reckon.
 

John U

Well-Known Member
But they dont offer a warmer white which is important for some.
They dont hit the peripherals much which in many places is just awful without it. They dont target the sides of the vehicle for 4wding.
Do they have a proper dedicated low beam for when traffic is near by? Have you thought about cars up ahead a 100m in the wet with those levels?
Diffusing the light has been done diy and commercial since the mid late 2000s.
I have been riding all kinds of dirt bikes offroad at night and never seen the need to lower the output or reduce the intensity, usually the lights dont produce anywhere near enough to want diff levels. I usually require upwards of 4000lumens with a wide 180degree beam angle and highly diffused lux while downhilling at speeds.
The claim these are the future is highly questionable I'm affraid, light is subjective like art, and sadly many bull bar mounts on newer cars are weaker and cause lights to Bob up and down badly, imo smaller light bars are better for many.
Every man and his dog all praise their lights in reckon.

I was initially concerned about the colour washing out and not being able to see animals. It hasn't been an issue yet.

They've got bulk amounts of light. The website quotes '175W and 10,800 effective lumens per light.' Not sure how it is measured but they don't need to be run at full power, and the spread beam cover didn't noticeably detract from the amount of light required to be effective. Again, the spread seemed good, and again, I haven't hit an animal yet.

I didn't notice too much movement on the lights. The brackets are fairly solid and the lights are squared off at the bottom which allows their COG in the bracket to be lower. I guess that the with the wall of light a large number of LEDs provide things like movement of the light may be less noticeable. I don't want a clear cut off at the edge of the lights spread either. This might also reduce how noticeable movement it.

As light technology gets brighter (it will) I can see people not wanting to run their lights at full brightness all the time. ARB have introduced a model in which you can dial down the brightness. I believe more will follow.

Yes, you are probably right. A lot will consider their own lights/purchases the best. What lights are you using @Bru9 ?

Link below is for the lights I used to use for Mtb racing. When you're out in the bush, by yourself, on a pushy, in the middle of the night, in all conditions, you don't want your lights to let you down, and I had the coin at the time, so I decided to go for the best I could get. I didn't go for the top of the line models but they never let me down. Dialling down the brightness on these lights was handy for saving battery power on the slower uphill bits.
 
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