Big Rocks

BlueCollie

Well-Known Member
#31
These next photos can be scrolled through fairly quickly as they were taken to show you the changes in colour in the rock at sunset, over a short period of time.

















Col.
I was listening to Dr Karl on the radio a few months back and he was saying Uluru isn't a rock at all but the tip of a subterranean mountain range. Anyone else heard of this? Apparantly the Olgas are part of the same range?
 

rogerazz

4x4 Earth Contributer
#34
The formation is a collection of hollow tubes of limestone called “solution pipes”, eroded by millions of years of rainfall. The process starts when water gathers in a shallow pan of sand and seeps downwards dissolving the limestone. The mineral saturated water then cements the sand, forming hard, trunk-shaped pipes. Most pipes around Cape Bridgewater are only three metres high, although some are as much as twenty metres.
 

BIGCOL

Well-Known Member
#37
hey BIGOL,Your fellow Victorian country men and women might argue the toss,lol,as of a recent trip to pine mountain national park it was then argued to be the largest monolith in australia
Ha! fully aware of Pine Mountains claim to fame, been there half a dozen times. 1.5 times the size of Uluru or something like that, the problem is that geologists and the like can't seem to agree on just what is the biggest plus what is a Rock, Monolith etc.
I think with certain we can say Uluru is not the biggest (whatever it is called) Rock or Monolith.
Col.
PS, the other thing is I don't have any real impressive pics of Pine Mountain as it is hard to photograph to show it's size etc, and it is big!
Here is a pic with just part of Pine Mountain in the background.



Col.
 

99pc chimpanzee

Well-Known Member
#38
PS, the other thing is I don't have any real impressive pics of Pine Mountain as it is hard to photograph to show it's size etc, and it is big!
Here you go Col,the first two are definitely P.Mountain,the third is definitely in area just not 100p.c,
Anyway it brings me great pleasure to bring these to you,because the effort to get them you remember for ever and will only do once:).You have been to bluff falls at Burrowa n.p I am sure,well I did the walk to Campbells lookout which is more or less right above bluff falls just up a bit higher:eek:,like steep walks its the way back that pulls on the hammies:D.Enjoy
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Ditch

Well-Known Member
#39
A granite outcrop 40 km`s east of home. Called "Little Bald Rock" on the maps but referred to as "Sydenham Rock" by the locals. Just over 1000 meters ASL. Would not like to be around when those "marbles" started to roll.

 

Spooner

Well-Known Member
#40
A granite outcrop 40 km`s east of home. Called "Little Bald Rock" on the maps but referred to as "Sydenham Rock" by the locals. Just over 1000 meters ASL. Would not like to be around when those "marbles" started to roll.
Yeah its funny who some of these rocks end up in places and just sit there for hundreds even thousands of years , but some day they will move , lol.
Here's one at the top of Snobs Creek Falls , just sitting on the edge , the front has already broken of and you can see the cracks in it made over time.
Snobs Creek Falls.jpg
 

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