Best cooking set up for long range touring

FranksnBeans

Well-Known Member
I like my food so have probably gone a bit overboard in terms of gear. I have a Coleman Hyperflame which is great in dodgy conditions. Never had a flame-out even when very windy. I hardly use it tho. Only if I can't have a campfire or I'm packing up camp early and just want a quick coffee. Sometimes I'll pull over on the side of a track and fire it up for a quick sausage sanga. I only carry those 500g propane bottles that are available everywhere. I always have one full spare bottle in a back drawer just in case. I don't use it often so they last long enough for me. In fact I just finished one bottle that's been rattling around in my 4wd for 18 months at least.

I carry a light non-stick pan for the gas burner, otherwise everything else is aimed at campfire cooking. A decent sized campfire oven (big enough for a whole chook and some veg), good sized cast iron pan, a billy from an army disposal store, a cast iron jaffle iron (this one gets a workout), a hillbilly hotplate which is handy when camping in a large group (can do half a dozen steaks at once no prob) and a few other odds and ends.

A good quality set of tongs is essential and possibly most of all - a set of welding gloves. It's great being able to reach into a hot fire and grab a hot piece of cast iron or even grabbing whole glowing logs to move some heat around while cooking. I also find the steel hook thing that comes with some campfire ovens super useful. Not just for moving a billy/oven around but for general campfire management too. A longhandled shovel is also useful for piling hot coals on top & around a campfire oven while doing a roast or whatever.
 

Lost1?

Well-Known Member
Been looking at a spun steel camp oven recently. Among other things. I need to reduce the weight of what I carry and will likely rejig the drawers and storage boxes in the back of my ute for the same reason. Every bit counts.
 

dabbler

Active Member
I pack for all types of cooking and camping. My camper has a gas based pullout kitchen and I carry a butane stove if I'm away from the camper daytripping. I also cook over coals/open fire and my Wooshka wood stove (even have the water boiler and chimney oven).

So while over the years I've owned various sete of cookware, now almost all my pots and pans etc are heavy-ish and can be used in any situation. Some of my stackable pots and lightweight hiking stuff wouldn't cut it if they were regularly mistreated like the heavy gear.

Maybe I'm carrying too much ? Nah ...
 

dabbler

Active Member
I have a dune butane stove from anaconda, nice stove but I worry about the dangers of carrying and storing the butane cylinders when travelling long distances. Any thoughts and advise on this ?.
I pack mine the same way I pack all cans and bottles. I pack them in a corrugated cardboard box or on corrugated cardboard if in a fridge, I use cardboard torn in strips to stop rubbing and I pad out the box/storage to stop movement.

I've used this method for 40+ years. I find corrugated cardboard is best but any substantial paper product will work. Cardboard is light, can be burnt or used as firestarters and is easily replaced if old and dodgy.
 

LongRoad2Go

Well-Known Member
Coming from a 30+ year Bushwalking Club background, gear evolved over the years, so was initially happy to simply use a billy (old jam tin with fencing wire), knife and spoon (sometimes a fork) and wire cake rack for toast and the odd steak/snag on winter trips. Then added one of the nesting billies in the photo below depending on the duration of the trip and if we needed to share food. Also have a few stoves for expedition and lazy car camping trips: MSR Whisper Lite, Trangia set, and even an old green Coleman LPG stove.

But, now older and softer doing vehicle-based stuff, the cooking gear has expanded to include a well-seasoned Bedourie Oven, cake rack trivet, and some enamel ware plates/bowls and cups because I hate eating/drinking off plastic crap. A long pair of tongs and a braided piece of fencing wire for fire use too.

The Bedourie is great because the lid functions as a frypan and, unlike cast iron, is lighter and won't break if treated unkindly. The only downside are the shitty little handles and unbalanced nature when lifting it - easier and safer to simply slide it off a fire with a boot or with that braided wire hook.

FYI: the best billies I've used are the nesting type with a high lid that functions as a standby bowl or mug - prefer aluminium over Stainless Steel because they are lighter and seem to be more non-stick. The best ones were made by UK company Hampton Works that also made the famous nesting 'Bulldog' tent poles - like Aussie Paddy-made gear, they were the envy of all hardcore Bushwalkers in the day.

I believe Hampton Works still make a variety of gear - it was, and probably still is, very high quality.


mil-con-billy-can-nesting-set-10612-p.jpg
 

Albynsw

Well-Known Member
I got a few of these delivered yesterday after seeing them on another forum.


The cans sit snugly in them so think they will go alright for cans and bottles on rough trips
 

RBJET

Well-Known Member
I got a few of these delivered yesterday after seeing them on another forum.


The cans sit snugly in them so think they will go alright for cans and bottles on rough trips
Now you need a contraption that goes on the other end so you can neck 4 cans at once.
 

cookie64

4x4 Earth Contributer
Like @FranksnBeans I too have the Coleman Hyperflame and used it in all sorts of conditions from Desert winds to Fraser Island and it just performs brilliantly, best Gas Cooker I have ever had and I think I've tried them all.

I no longer pack the Cast Camp Oven to reduce weight and being solo most of the times I really don't need to cook large meals, I have also rationalised to 2 frypans, collapsable pot & strainer and a Billy, I do still take my EcoBilly for quickly brewing a cuppa first thing in the morning, this all packs into the drawer with my Dry Foods at the back of the draw, except the EcoBilly.

When I do take the Camp Oven, Welding Gloves and a pair of locking pliers work well for the lid, I pack the gloves inside the oven along with anything else loose that fits just to stop the lid from smacking around.
 

cam04

Well-Known Member
Did a long lap on the weekend up to New England national park and back through Sundown.
Can confirm that the new lunchbox cooker works well on butane most times and on the cold mornings just use a propane bottle.
Also the Stanley cookset works very well.
 

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cookie64

4x4 Earth Contributer
Did a long lap on the weekend up to New England national park and back through Sundown.
Can confirm that the new lunchbox cooker works well on butane most times and in the mornings just use a propane bottle.
Also the Stanley cookset works very well.
Did Cape York in 2009 with 2 of those, they did well, used them for quite a long time actually through High Country, Simpson etc, then I saw the Hyperflame and was impressed so bought one - was about the time the canister units were going through some difficulties due to some incidents, and have used the Hyperflame to death, was on an open plain tucked in between 2 dunes with the wind rushing through and it didn't miss a beat.
 

Albynsw

Well-Known Member
Did a long lap on the weekend up to New England national park and back through Sundown.
Can confirm that the new lunchbox cooker works well on butane most times and in the mornings just use a propane bottle.
Also the Stanley cookset works very well.

Thanks Cam, my first lesson for the day. I didn’t know those dual fuel units even existed
Do you notice that is runs hotter on the bottle?
 

cam04

Well-Known Member
Thanks Cam, my first lesson for the day. I didn’t know those dual fuel units even existed
Do you notice that is runs hotter on the bottle?
On cold mornings it sure does haha. it runs slightly hotter on propane, yes. They do a higher output version again but I cannot recall ever needing to crank my old one right up so I didn't bother with it. Plus it is bigger and space in the ute kitchen is at a premium. I assumed I wouldn't need induction cooking but I'm sitting here working out of my ute charging the laptop on a dodgy old inverter, so I might just have to upgrade that from 150w to 3000W and start another snowball running downhill! A bloke has to have projects haha.
 

cookie64

4x4 Earth Contributer
On cold mornings it sure does haha. it runs slightly hotter on propane, yes. They do a higher output version again but I cannot recall ever needing to crank my old one right up so I didn't bother with it. Plus it is bigger and space in the ute kitchen is at a premium. I assumed I wouldn't need induction cooking but I'm sitting here working out of my ute charging the laptop on a dodgy old inverter, so I might just have to upgrade that from 150w to 3000W and start another snowball running downhill! A bloke has to have projects haha.
Sorry @cam04 & @Albynsw , I didn't open the picture and thought it was the generic gas burner and didn't realise it was a big bugger of an upgrade - haven't seen these.
 

Albynsw

Well-Known Member
I saw them recently but thought, for the money and size, your better off sticking to an ebay butane cooker at 1/5 of the price and size.

Yes fair comment. As a result of seeing that one I stumbled on this and for $20 odd bucks I ordered one. Apart from the size I quite like the wind guards on it. https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/3835998...AGNGr7VRkm&var=&widget_ver=artemis&media=COPY
I was only thinking of it as a backup stove but will be interesting to see how it goes, might be the dedicated coffee pot stove
 

Albynsw

Well-Known Member
Yes fair comment. As a result of seeing that one I stumbled on this and for $20 odd bucks I ordered one. Apart from the size I quite like the wind guards on it. https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/3835998...AGNGr7VRkm&var=&widget_ver=artemis&media=COPY
I was only thinking of it as a backup stove but will be interesting to see how it goes, might be the dedicated coffee pot stove

Tried out the little stove for the last couple of morning coffees and it worked a treat. The wind guards can fold up close to the coffee pot to contain the heat and it brings it to the boil faster than the conventional butane stoves.

FullSizeRender.jpeg


The only negative I would say is it only has a three leg trifet and there is a good chance you could tip a pot or pan off it when in use but perfect for the coffee pot. There is another similar model that has a larger 4 leg trifet which I have ordered to see what it is like, it doesn’t have the wind guard though which is why I didn’t get it first up.
All of this for a product I don’t even need in the first place hahaha
 
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