Best cooking set up for long range touring

Martin69

New Member
Hi guys, In a few months I’m planing on doing a big lap. I’ve been running a little jumbuck bbq for the past couple years and it’s starting to fall apart. Would love to hear/see some of the cooking set ups people are running for long range touring and what works best with all the consideration's of space quality & practicality. The baby q looks great but it’s pretty big.
Cheers
 
Hi guys, In a few months I’m planing on doing a big lap. I’ve been running a little jumbuck bbq for the past couple years and it’s starting to fall apart. Would love to hear/see some of the cooking set ups people are running for long range touring and what works best with all the consideration's of space quality & practicality. The baby q looks great but it’s pretty big.
Cheers
 

Hoyks

Well-Known Member
I use a Coleman Dual Fuel stove. It takes a little bit of assembly, but its very light, lights pretty easily and puts out heaps of heat. I also trust liquid fuel more than I trust gas in the back of my canopy.
Petrol can be picked up pretty much anywhere and 5L of unleaded will easily last me a week.
You probably also want to pack a spare generator (fuel jet thing that goes in it) as the dual fuel lantern I have went through a few of them, the stove is still on its original, even though its 20 years old.
The only down side I have found is that it rattles a bit, not a big issue now its in the back of my ute bit it annoyed me in the wagon.
I paid $200, 20 years ago and I have seen them cheap on FB marketplace.



For 1st coffee in the morning, quick stops and overnight, I don't think you can beat a reasonable quality butane stove that runs those disposable cans.

For something bomb proof, then old stule gas rings are reliable and the jets don't clog up.
 

Colly18

Well-Known Member
We've done the big lap and a few half laps + heaps of extra hol's/partial laps.
On the road, on a big lap, you'll find yourself in various situations. Sometimes you will want an open fire and in other situations that just won't be possible. The combination kit that has (and does) work best for us (and it is pretty space friendly) over a few decades is;
1) a wire grill rack that can be used to BBQ various meats and foods over coals
2) a decent sized camp oven, that can be used for a variety of baking and cooking needs (usually dampers, cakes, roasts, stews, in our case),
3) a good 2 burner gas stove with decent BTU output (for anything you use a gas stove for) (+ we've recently acquired a full hot plate to suit for BBQ'ing when open fires are not allowed, inconvenient or you just need a quicker solution), and,
4) an old kettle to put on the fire.
We work on the KISS principle.
 

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Toyasaurus

Well-Known Member
I`ll second Hoyks, the Colman dual fuel is great I`ve had mine for about 8yrs, never missed a beat.
I buy shellite from bunnings, I find it seems to burn a bit hotter and last`s longer than ULP
The butane ones I found don`t work to well in the high country when it`s very cold, otherwise very good.
 

Lost1?

Well-Known Member
A butane single burner and a Coleman two burner gas stove has worked for me. Add in a camp fire of an evening and that has most bases covered. I accept the butane stove can ice up when the temps get into low single digits.
 

Batts88

Well-Known Member
Also a Travel Buddy is good for heating pies and pre cooked meals if you stop overnight or for lunches and don't want to have to set up gear to cook.
 

reel

New Member
I use a Coleman Dual Fuel stove. It takes a little bit of assembly, but its very light, lights pretty easily and puts out heaps of heat. I also trust liquid fuel more than I trust gas in the back of my canopy.
Petrol can be picked up pretty much anywhere and 5L of unleaded will easily last me a week.
You probably also want to pack a spare generator (fuel jet thing that goes in it) as the dual fuel lantern I have went through a few of them, the stove is still on its original, even though its 20 years old.
The only down side I have found is that it rattles a bit, not a big issue now its in the back of my ute bit it annoyed me in the wagon.
I paid $200, 20 years ago and I have seen them cheap on FB marketplace.



For 1st coffee in the morning, quick stops and overnight, I don't think you can beat a reasonable quality butane stove that runs those disposable cans.

For something bomb proof, then old stule gas rings are reliable and the jets don't clog up.
I have a dune butane stove from anaconda, nice stove but I worry about the dangers of carrying and storing the butane cylinders when travelling long distances. Any thoughts and advise on this ?.
 

Lost1?

Well-Known Member
I drive a ute. All gas canisters/bottles are in the tray. I carry jerries in the back of the cab. I remove the back seats and use a ratchet strap to hold them down. I only travel one or two up.

You could hard wire a travel buddy into a wired fuse block. I have hard wired my fridge to the fuse block.
 

Hoyks

Well-Known Member
I have a dune butane stove from anaconda, nice stove but I worry about the dangers of carrying and storing the butane cylinders when traveling long distances. Any thoughts and advise on this ?.
I haven't had any issues with them. Mine live in a plastic box in the ute with my cooking stuff and while they will rattle around a bit and get the paint chipped up, I haven't seen one close to being damaged enough to leak. Even the one that did Cape York in the box with the cast iron camp oven survived with remarkably little damage.
You could put a stubbie cooler over the cap for extra protection.

I have had a gas bottle leak in the back of the wagon from the tap being bumped. (Dad, something smells like gas. Stop your whining kids and go to sleep)
 

Traveller

4x4 Earth Contributer
Really depends on what you want mate. The little butane stoves are fine for most things, but not great-and are really useless in extra cold conditions. The gas two burners works well but you need a bottle, and not that easy to fit a decent size frypan on, without adding a saucepan to the next burner. There are a number of other fuel varieties with pros and cons-really seems to come down to personal preference. These days I run a couple of Coleman powerpack stoves with a butane jobbie as well. The coleman ones can use either the green propane bottles or use an adapter and attach to full size gas bottle. I like them as they are a single burner with high output and versatile, but each to their own.
Good luck with the trip, wouldn't mind doing it again myself-bloody work....
 

reel

New Member
Thanks Traveller, what you say makes sense I think I will look for a baby Weber or a Coleman like yours.
Work can be good mate, I sold my business late last year. Since retiring I have had health issues almost continuously, whilst I was working the old body was going ok.
 

Toyasaurus

Well-Known Member
I forgot to mention I also have a single burner coleman that live`s in my billy.
It`s great for the billy and anything extra you might need a third burner for.
 

Batts88

Well-Known Member
How have you connected the travel buddy for power in your vehicle ?.
It's in the canopy on my ute there's an aux battery in there as well. I put an anderson plug on the power lead and always leave it plugged in which is safe because you have to turn on both power and temp dials to turn it on.
For the butane canisters you could try putting stubby coolers on either end and put rags in the gaps where you store them.
 
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