Beach driving tips needed

The Rookie

New Member
g'day,

I dont get to go out 4x4ing too much dont really know a lot about it.

I was out at Coorong a couple of months ago and got bogged twice and needed to be pulled out by 2 different people :mad:

Are there any tips that could help.

I have an old Ford Maverick, but I think it was more me than anything else.

Thanx

The Rookie
 

Muddy Waters

New Member
Hey Rookie,

Sand can be a challenge. A couple of tricks are to let some air out of the tyres. Get a good pressure gauge and let them down to increase the amount of rubber in contact with the sand.
Dont forget to reinflate when you leave the beach or you may roll the tyres off the rims.
Keep momentum going.
Dont turn too tightly.

Hope that helps

Muddy
 

myjk

New Member
To the rookie. If you are to go on sand in a rebadged patrol these are my recommendations first drop your tyres down to 30 - 20psi no more than 15psi. the psi range is big because I do not know your loaded 4x4. more weight more psi. Also do not drive fast this only spins the wheels drive with momentum (eg) when you get of the hard pack (water line) hit the soft sand and don't slow down or speed up fast. Try and do it with a low rpm so if you do need more speed you have it. Try and think of it as how fast are my wheels spinning not how fast am I moving and try to start in 2nd gear this will help. ps keep to the road rules as all drivable beaches are roads eg keep left and give way to the right.
 

AdamN

New Member
Hi Rookie - remember some good manners as well - make sure you take your own basic recovery gear and if you get stuck, get it ready so you don't hold up others. Plenty of experience at Stockton Beach and most people wave you over, want to borrow your gear and then are happy to watch you do all the work!
If you are going by yourself, have a look at Maxtrax - great for getting out of sand with a little practice and not expensive.

Good luck
 

The Rookie

New Member
Thanks for all the tips.

I saw an ad for MaxTrax and I was wondering if they are any good. Might check them out this weekend.

Super Cheap Auto has a basic recovery set. Has anyone got any experience with it. Is that a good place to start or should I be looking at something else. I don't want to go overboard, but I don't want to be the guy on the track with no recovery gear :)

Cheers
 

extremelimitsoff

New Member
Super Cheap Recovery Equipment

Just noticed the post re Recovery Equipment

Super Cheap does some recovery gear, but in my experience buying from Super Cheap leads to getting in your car twice.

Once to buy the goodies on offer and the second to return the carp (intentionally mis spelt) for a refund so you can go and buy quality gear that wont injur, kill you or damage your truck or someone elses when it does fail.

Have a look around there is some high quality gear on offer at all the 4x4 shops both bricks and mortar stores and online.
 
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Daz

New Member
Rookie;

Try not to use your brakes in the soft sand to stop, just lift off the accelerator and let the sand slow you down. Its a little unsettling at first, but it means you don't force the wheels into the sand. It makes taking off eaiser.

Is the Mav auto or manual? Auto's are better in sand conditions as they will always be in the correct gear.

Maxtraxx are useful in more than just sand. I think they retail for about $250 a pair.

As to recovery equipiment, there isn't and large price difference between good quality equipiment and the cheap stuff. Terrain Tamer do a snatch strap kit for about $100, which includes 9m snatch strap, rated bow shackles, all in a carry bag.

Hope this helps

Daz
 

steve80

Member
Gday Rookie I bought my snatch straps from Autobahn 10000kg (10T) for about $60 each and mate I have given them a workout from both ends and have never let me down, Trick to it is to wash them if they get muddy and let them dry. Cant remember what brand they are.I saw a troopy full of backpackers on fraser come off the hard below high tide sand on to the soft stuff and he tried to change gear and he just bogged straight down so basically pick your gear before you attempt the soft sand. Cheers Steve
 
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GUTSHOT

New Member
Had A Mq Patrol,l28 Some Time Back And This Thing Always Got Stuck In Sand,
Had To Keep Your Speed Up Or It Would Sink Like The Kids At The Pool.changed The Auto Freewheeling Hubs To Manual Lockers And The Thing Was Unstopable In Sand....shaty Auto Hubs Didnt Work:
 

Tats

New Member
Driving on Sand - YEAH!

Well Rookie, there's plenty of good advice there, and here's a bit more. Basic gear should include a snatch strap, a jack with a reasonably sizeable piece of wood to put under it - you can't just jack straight on sand, towing points front and rear on your vehicle, a spade is handy if you have to dig yourself out, and if you have an old mat at home that you can cut down the centre to make two bits to put under your wheels to help extricate you would be a help. Be careful driving too close to the water, as sometimes the sand has too much water in it and acts like quicksand trapping you, and watch tide changes. You can safely deflate your tyres down as far as 10 or 12 psi (in the old measurements), but usually about 15 psi is more than adequate. Don't charge over sandhills without first looking to see what's on the other side, a large drop off can damage your truck, or if someone is there you can certainly kill or seriously injure them. When turning on sand always turn downhill, don't try to battle the sand by turning uphill, you'll only roll your truck if you try - it's easier for you to drive around in a circle until you're square on to the direction you want to go. When descending high steep sandhills keep you vehicle pointing straight, don't get sideways, the back will often dig in causing you to have to use the accelerator to keep the vehicle moving on down, but, again, don't get sidways. Where possible stay in the wheel tracks as the sand is more compacted by previous vehicles. Respect others that are using the area, don't drive through their camp or picnic sites. Watch for blokes fishing, and don't drive under their lines, go around, and take your rubbish out with you. It's a good idea to have a good pump with which to re-inflate your tyres. Some servos get a bit snakey with blokes rocking in to use their free air, and some put on a charge. But above all, mate, have a great and a safe time.:D:D:D

Tats:cool:
 

goldrush

Moderator
Go slow when you see other vehicles parked up high on the beach. Kids can run out at any time and with the sound of the wind and surf they won't hear you coming.
 

4X4

Moderator
If you are going to travel in the dunes a flag is a must! Make sure it is at least 4 metres high from the ground.
 

Sharky

New Member
As everyone has said, drop pressure to 15psi BEFORE you even go onto the beach. Even with a load on & cheap tyres, at a slow pace you shouldn't do any harm to them. Good sand or mud tyres do help greatly.

Try to feel what the car wants to do & go with it, don't fight it unless u have to. If you have to turn or if the car wants to crab walk or take a different path to what you want, do so with a little more throttle. When the front wheels are turned, they push into & thru the sand rather than rolling over it, so you need to put more power to them.

If you feel the car slowing & the wheels slipping & you think it's about to sink, STOP. Put it in reverse & let the clutch out slowly. Once you are on firmish ground again, either take an alternative path or approach at higher speed. Or if it goes so far backwards & then wants to do the same thing, stop & go fowards again. You will find that you will go a little further fowards & backwards each time & you will eventually be able to drive out. I have unbogged myself many times this way & have never needed snatching out on any beach yet. Remember, you will not get a car out with the front wheels turned sharply.

ALWAYS carry a spade/shovel. If you are bogged, get out & dig yourself out......backwards is usually best as you have somewhat compacted the sand as you drove over it or at least created little ruts & therefore not pushing thru fresh sand. Don't take ANY shortcuts when trying to retrieve your car. You'll only get bogged worse. Dig behind all tyres, creating a flat path for them & ensure diffs & control arms are clear of the ground.

If you can, tag along with someone who is experienced & can help you & show you what to do. See if you can ride with someone in their car & observe how it's done. I'd offer you a ride but I live in perth, sorry :)
 

grit

Member
Pretty much everything has been covered here. Just want to emphasise the importance of suppressing the urge to brake when descending very steep dunes. Tickle the throttle and if the front begins to bog in accelerate enough to keep the wheels up ontop. Contrary to the belief of many, radial road tyres or AT's generally perform better than aggressive tyres on sand. Don't attempt to drive home on the blacktop with your tyres down around 15psi. I'm sure 4x4 has put up a post on here somewhere about correct recovery procedure. Tackling the dunes is very different than most other forms of 4 wheelin and something everyone should experience at-least once, but only with correct training. You will hear this a lot, but if you want to enjoy the full experience join a reputable club.
 

Sharky

New Member
Very true......roll with it down a dune, don't drive it, just roll with it in a way that enables u 2 drive it out down the bottom....& straighten up when level again, not whilst descending.

Wot u say about tyre types can be true....BUT I have proven many times that it is an advantage to have sand or mud tyres over A/T's or radials especially when climbing UP the dunes. The mixed opinions come from the fact that some A/T's r more agressive than the biggest selling snad tyres. You can't tell me that less grip is better than lots of grip. You will find all comparisons made by so called experts have been done on beaches. Most beaches in Oz r pretty firm. Find a really soft set of dunes & try both types of tyres on your car. I promise u will never say that again. There is a reason that sand tyres have tractor type grip with emphasis on the sidewall grip & strong sidewalls that allow the pressure to be dropped below that of other tyres to allow maximum balooning effect without damage. Also, lighter cars & varying diff ratios require different tyres than heavier cars etc.

There is a video goin around by some big time aussie 4x4 adventurer talkin sh!t about tyres. I can't remember his name but by the time the video was over I had to get some toilet paper to wipe the verbal diorhea out of my ears. My aunty works for bridgestone australia, & I can tell you that wot this bloke said about the inside of the tyres peeling away from extensive use at low pressure is either crap or he tested it on some cheap chinese tyre. Yes they do get damaged from this but not that damage. If his tyres got so hot as to do that then either he was driving on tarmac at high speed with 15psi in em or he had extra heat in his hubs from a worn bearing. Doing this causes rubber fatigue & splitting. Anyhoo.......back on topic.
 
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frosty

4x4 Earth Contributer
Hey Rookie,

Sand can be a challenge. A couple of tricks are to let some air out of the tyres. Get a good pressure gauge and let them down to increase the amount of rubber in contact with the sand.
Dont forget to reinflate when you leave the beach or you may roll the tyres off the rims.
Keep momentum going.
Dont turn too tightly.

Hope that helps

Muddy


Mate, be wary of underinflated tyres at speed. THEY CAN CATCH FIRE! Soft tyres create more friction, therefore more heat. Eventually, they will tear too shreads or ignite! Always pumpem up BEFORE you hit the highway. And just go easy on the throttle on the sand. If you start to lose traction, don't gas it. Keep the throttle steady and start screwing the steers side to side. Have fun, ya gunna get bogged again! Everyone does. Just be ready for it!!:cool:
 

LowLux

Moderator
I may have missed it somewhere in the previous posts but I reckon it'd be a good idea to also attach a nice bright sand flag to stand a long way up from your vehicle if doing any dunes on top of everything else that has been mentioned. Have fun Rookie.
 

grit

Member
I may have missed it somewhere in the previous posts but I reckon it'd be a good idea to also attach a nice bright sand flag to stand a long way up from your vehicle if doing any dunes on top of everything else that has been mentioned. Have fun Rookie.

yes lowlux, 4x4 did mention the 4 metre high flag earlier in this thread.

I'm now searching for a pic I have, conquering the biggest mother of a sand dune at Stockton beach (softest sand you will find anywhere in Aus.) while on standard Goodyear Wrangler AT's (50% worn). Only one that made it on the day against a myriad of other tyre types. There was a well defined (in the pic) drift from about 2/3's of the way up to the top and most of the more aggressive tyres simply dug in while the Goodyear radials with their more flexible sidewalls ballooned that well they kept me ontop with enough of a footprint to hold surface traction right to the top. There is a small video of it posted on a website many years ago (hopefully I can track it down and link to it) and I do have some photos on an archive CD that I will seek out.
 
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