beach camping tech advice

Cakehead

New Member
hi guys going to frazer island in october and taking my girlfriends camper trailer was wondering what the deal was with tyre pressures on the camper trailer should i drop the pressure on those tyres too? any advice would be appreciated thanks guys:)
 

Pure Yobbo

Moderator
Hi Mate,

Drop the pressure on your rig. Say 20 PSI meassure the width of the Tyre, say 300mm maybe.

Deflate the trailers tyres so they are the same width. They may only need to drop to 26Psi for example. That way they are the same width.

Just my own opion.

Cheers
 

zoom

Member
My response to that Q? is yes . You want to try & get as least amount of drag resistance as possible, beleive it or not ,fully inflated tryes will bog down , especially in soft inland tracks. Whereas deflated tyres will float becuase of greater surface area . I've used 18 & 20 lb in trailers before , my vehicle required 15lb front & rear . That was Stockton Beach (Newcasle ) at southern end & years ago . hope that helps
 

cruiserlad

4x4 Earth Contributer
i usually drop my tyers on the forby and trailer down to 18 lbs but also take the manta ray as they water the track out to there barge every night and they have maxtrax on board if you get stuck for a small fee 2 bucks and dont miss going over to the western side of raser its brillant especially when theres a strong south easter blowing
 

goldrush

Moderator
As Yobbo has already said, the ideal situation is to have the tyres on the trailer with the same size "footprint" as the tyres on the vehicle.
 

cruiserlad

4x4 Earth Contributer
yeah if ya want to measure them but 18lbs is a good rule of thumb or lower if it has been real dry and the sand is powdery
 

zoom

Member
Now one thing to consider is that a foot print at say 18lb on a vehicle will not be the same as the trailer . It all depends on weight on each axle/wheel.
 

Sharky

New Member
Hi Mate,

Drop the pressure on your rig. Say 20 PSI meassure the width of the Tyre, say 300mm maybe.

Deflate the trailers tyres so they are the same width. They may only need to drop to 26Psi for example. That way they are the same width.

Just my own opion.

Cheers

Y would ya wanna do that? The tyres on the camper r not the same size or type as on the car, nor is the trailer the same weight.

I've pulled my camper (weighed in @ nearly 1000kg) thru some BOGGY dunes. I have 14" light truck tyres on it that have quite a defined edge between the tread & sidewalls (not ideal for sand). BUT.........the track (distance between wheels) is the same as on my cruza so I found that the camper was always on top of the sand as the car had somewhat compacted the sand for the camper. It did sink a little when climbing dunes as there was less traction so the car's tyres left little tranches instead of compacting but it was no struggle.

Remember the trailer just rolls over the sand. It does not have a driving axle. Don't forget also that u don't wanna create extra drag as this will increase your chances of bogging the car, not to mention extra fuel.

A trailer can rescued pretty easily so just detach if u get bogged & get it out seperately later.

So to answer this question I would have to say NO, I don't let mine down.

Engage low range b4 u go on sand & don't be tempted to go into high unless the trailer is off.
 
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zoom

Member
I'm no expert but I can say I've driven on Moreton Is, ( east of Brisbane ) & I kid you not I've driven there during drought & the sand at 30-40kms/hr gave up dust so bad you couldn't see a vehicle 50m behind you. Imagine how difficult it was to drive; let alone have a trailer with full tyre pressures'.Lowering tyre pressures can only minimize the need to, as you type rescue a trailer easily. Isn't it wiser to head off extra trouble before it happens ( personaly Im an energy conservationist , if lower trailer tyres stops extra work I'm happy ) I'll leave it to the readers
 

Pure Yobbo

Moderator
Now one thing to consider is that a foot print at say 18lb on a vehicle will not be the same as the trailer . It all depends on weight on each axle/wheel.

That's correct Zoom - Thats why you measure the tyre widths. The trailer pressure may need to be lower to achieve the same width.

Cheers
 

Pure Yobbo

Moderator
Y would ya wanna do that? The tyres on the camper r not the same size or type as on the car, nor is the trailer the same weight.

I've pulled my camper (weighed in @ nearly 1000kg) thru some BOGGY dunes. I have 14" light truck tyres on it that have quite a defined edge between the tread & sidewalls (not ideal for sand). BUT.........the track (distance between wheels) is the same as on my cruza so I found that the camper was always on top of the sand as the car had somewhat compacted the sand for the camper. It did sink a little when climbing dunes as there was less traction so the car's tyres left little tranches instead of compacting but it was no struggle.

Remember the trailer just rolls over the sand. It does not have a driving axle. Don't forget also that u don't wanna create extra drag as this will increase your chances of bogging the car, not to mention extra fuel.

A trailer can rescued pretty easily so just detach if u get bogged & get it out seperately later.

So to answer this question I would have to say NO, I don't let mine down.

Engage low range b4 u go on sand & don't be tempted to go into high unless the trailer is off.

Each to there own i supose. But IMHO leaving a set of cheese cutting road tyres fully inflated would just be destroying the tracks, why not deflate and save the tracks?

Cheers
 

zoom

Member
I concur but Im a mere energy conservationist. I like the words " may need to be " it implies proportional tyre inflation to weight , tyre type , track condition , tow vehicle etc ... With so may variables is it worth the risk of bogging down with vehicle & trailer. Hence , Im an energy conservationist
 

Sharky

New Member
How can a 175/74/R14" light truck tyre POSSIBLY balloon to the same extent of a 33x12" muddie???? Coz that's wot I have! My camper tyres would go dead flat & not get as wide. And they didn't leave a scratch in the sand..........that's wot I'm tryin 2 say.

As I said, the camper is LIGHTER & has a LAZY axle so sand drag is not as great. If the track of the camper sits outside the track of the car than maybe let em down but it doesn't matter what tyre pressure u have.........the track won't change just coz u let the tyres down will it??? U will have 2 sets of low tyres that sit in different places on the ground.



Over & out!
 
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zoom

Member
I'd say that trailer tyres that size invite trouble with the combo of the weight you speak of & diametre/rolling surface but saying that it's a rubics cube of technical data. Travel some areas where I've been & you'll be reaching for the UHF asking for me to venture back & help or as equally desastrous wait for you .
Much easier to spend 90 seconds each tyre dropping pressures , what have you got to loose inside of 10 mins ,if your very thourough.
The main point to consider here is that not everyone has the luxury of you're setup or expert experience Sharky. As an example , now days I couldn't do what you do with that trailer because of the soft roader I drive (many years ago I'd eat everything up , vehicles & terrain). That would obviously change with the next vehicle that came along.
 

Sharky

New Member
I don't understand your thought process (not meant to taken offensively). I really don't. I work my way up in the world not down. I only upgrade. Newer isn't nessecarily better. I would never trade for a newer car that couldn't out-do my old 1.

I got my experience by trying things. I don't need to be taught to learn. Look, observe, perceive (with common sense), calculate (with previous knowledge & observation), & discern. Then act...........& learn. Whalah! experience.

My set up isn't all that. Yeah I have susp mods but that means squat in sand. In fact softer is better & I was using a heavy duty leaf sprung cruza ute with a half cactus rear diff & a bald set of bridgestone muds & a heavy camper with light truck tyres.

Believe me, I've had that camper on nearly every type of terrain minus snow. Thes tyres are rated to carry more weight than any other tyre that will fit without rubbing somewhere. They don't balloon well as a result but I've never needed them to. They are a tough tyre & take a punishing. They have a very flat tread which many all terrains do as they also have a sharp edge between the tread & sidewall, at least BFG, Goodyear's & bridgestones do. They're just wider than my light truck tyres, that's all. ;)

Trust me.........if your camper tyres sit evenly in the track of your car tyres, providing u have a decent 4x4 with good mud or sand tyres, u won't need to let yor camper tyres down in sand. Try it & u will c wot I mean. I'm tryin 2 find pics I had of it. The camper tyres sat on top of the sand to the point where u would think it had been carefully placed there from above :)

The only time this won't work is if your 4x4 weighs less than 1700kg, is a 4cy or has crap tyres on for sand. I know it sounds unreal but it's not. Try it. U will b surprised.

Look at it this way..........if a 2000Kg car with 4 driving wheels under that weight can go through, than a camper weighing 700kg (conservatively) rolling over the pre compacted sand with a lazy axle is gonna float! :cool: I know, coz I've done it.......a few times & I've never been bogged in sand in a 4x4 (I've come bloody close but) :D.
 
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grit

Member
Don't you just love a thread that runs like this one. With all these variables thrown into the mix.

Lets cut to the chase by firstly dispelling some of those variables that equate to the same thing. A single axle trailer with 175 x 75 x14"s would need its tyres up close to maximum inflation when carrying 1000Kg of load. At 'normal road pressures' these tyres may not require any further deflation, particularly when travelling along the same track as a pulling vehicle with a bald set of tyres over compactable sand of 'average' consistency.

Zoom: Yes I have witnessed a few vehicles pulling trailers become badly bogged on that track that leads from 'Lavis Lane' onto Stockton Dunes(south end). Here the sand does not compact but simply spreads and the trailer is already being pulled through deeper ruts than the vehicle. The drivers having little experience in this type of sand often select low range which can dig them down to the floorboards in seconds, making for a difficult recovery.

All of the general rules for driving in sand still apply;
  • Use 4wd, high range.
  • Fairly high speeds are necessary.
  • Gear changes, only if absolutely necessary, must be made quickly, especially down to second gear.
  • Avoid the lee side of sand hills as sand drifts tend to gather there.
  • Use a higher gear than normal. Greater speed tends to keep the tyres riding higher on the sand, that is, on the sand's crust.
  • Apply power when traction is better, down hills or along hard sand, to build up speed.
  • Traction may be improved by reducing tyre pressure.
 

zoom

Member
Now , the whole point of this thread was to help out a driver not sure of what to do in sand with a trailer. That being the case & that we won't be there with them ,I think it wise to run with lower tyres ,after all we won't be there to rescue him. The skills mentioned are as said reached after lots of off road work.
Sharky , the reason my old girl had to go was cancer , way to many trips to Fraser Is, Bribie Is, Moreton Is & Nth Stradbroke Is. Couldn't afford a new Cruiser & didn't want other peoples problems .So had to compromise , I got this new girl & loaded her up with just about all the extras I could.
 

Cakehead

New Member
Beach camping

thanks sharky and everyone else who has replied. Am totally unsure what to do now some say let them down others say not too! I drive a new hilux 2008 model its a extra cab tray back has 2.5 inch suspension lift, front and back lockers and coopers mud tyres its a 4 cylinder turbo diesel and manual. Also u were saying never use low range gears what about when say u were going from indian head to orchid beach its a steap hill and very soft ive always used low range second gear to go up would i be better to go in high first gear, thanks again for all your replies and hope to here from u soon guys!!!:)
 
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Traveller

Well-Known Member
I have always been told of sand driving to air down vehicles tyres, then measure the 'length'
of the tyre 'footprint'. Then air down the trailer tyre to match this footprint. Length, not width
here is the key, as not all tyres bag out the same.
 
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BUSHNUT

Well-Known Member
I have always been told of sand driving to air down vehicles tyres, then measure the 'length'
of the tyre 'footprint'. Then air down the trailer tyre to match this footprint. Length, not width
here is the key, as not all tyres bag out the same.

Traveller has got it spot on,not surprising he drives a patrol and he is a Victorian and he does look cute after a few ! In fact the old standard width tyres will perform much better deflated than the sporty wider tyres that are on most 4X4 today, they may look crap in comparison but the further out in the Outback thats is what the locals use .

In an thread the question was asked High 1st or Low range in a higher gear - Low range every time, that way you have more options dow and up, in high 1st that is your lowest option !

:D:D:D:D:):):):p:p:p:D:D:D:D
 
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