ARC or MIG welding

#22
I prefer an inverter ARK. Smooth to use and really portable. If you are buying a welder I believe the extra cost of an Inverter ARK is worthwhile. MIG gets a whole lot more expensive and getting the gas is a hastle as well. As far a weld quality now a great deal of difference. If someone can give you a few lessons its not to hard.
 
#23
depends on your experince.
Im a boilermaker by trade and use inverter ARC every day in onsite high rise construction. but when screwing around at home workin with lighter gauge stuff i'll use my cute little ozito gassless MIG.
MIGS are alot easier for novices to pick up. but quality with a stick is aquired through experince, are im not talkin a simple down hand fillet that they taught us all back in high school.

Ryan
 
#24
Tig i mess about at home and found a little inverter tig /stick is great just slower but easier for the novice =me .
Mig is a lot quicker though.
 
#25
Hi guys!
I was given an old welder by my neigbour as he got a newer, bigger unit from his work so now I need to learn how to use it.
I have seen it in action in the build of a rally car last year (before it was given to me)
My neigbour is going to give me some lessons as there does not seem to be any places that have part time training in the Newcastle area anymore.

The unit I have is a Lincoln Electric Jet Welder 130 with 0-130 current control.
It came on a trolley and with a heap of welding rods too.

I have had trouble finding any info online for this model but know it's quite old.
Anyone know anything about them?
 
#28
The simplest trick with an arc welder new or old is knowing your welder and selecting the right size and type of electrode for the job. Dont be afraid to give her a test run on scap. And a grinder is ya best friend ( even as a pro :p )
For most things on 4bys 2-2.5 mm electrode are fine in a GP, heaverier stuff around towbars, wheel carriers etc you may go for 3.2 low hydrogen.
Electrode brand wise for amatuer welders you cant go past WIA 12p's (GP rods) and WIA 16TC (Low Hydrogens).

Ryan
 
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#29
Does an ARC welder do stronger/better than a MIG welder for D.I.Y. sliders etc ?
I know a few old school engineers and boilermakers, and they say ARC is better, but surely these days, a mig would be up to the task.
99% of the aftermarket 4wd accessories are welded using MIG process, in saying that they would be using gas. However for those of you wanting to take on the DIY projects at home a gasless MIG is more than enough. Gas not only costs you a lot your also introducing problems like porosity due to wind, let's face it will all don't have big workshops at home that can be shut up on a windy day, gasless has the advantage of being able to weld over Galv, Paint and the common surface rust, (I would advise only do this were a grinder can't clean the job though). Unlike Arc welding MIG is very forgiving on your fit ups which is handy when we're starting out. A few tips for those trying home projects
- Clean with a grinder we're you plan to weld makes all the differance
-When welding a thick gauge steel to a light gauge always preheat the heavy gauge item between 50 and 100 deg i.e. (a stub axle if you were building a rear bar)
- Steel contracts when your weld is cooling (twice as much with Stainless Steels) so brace your job with off cuts and don't remove them till it's cooled right down
- If welding a seam, back stepping your weld is a good idea
- When chasing strength weld in a verticle up position if possible, however a bit of practice on scrap will help to fine tune the machine so you don't blow holes in your light gauge material
- It's always a good idea to isolate your batteries before welding on your vehicle
- Another for welding thick gauge to light gauge is don't be afraid to turn your amps up, just be sure to direct your heat at the heavy and wash it across to the light
- If you were fabbing up a set of sliders you would want a decent quality weld, last thing you want is jacking off your sliders and having a weld break and do some uneeded panel damage. So make sure you burn in both edges if you get cold roll your best off grinding it out and having another go
- Spend the extra dollars on a decent wire, you can't beat Lincoln and sometimes Cig Weld

That's a start I could go on and on but that's enough typing for now
Hope this helps
 
#30
99% of the aftermarket 4wd accessories are welded using MIG process, in saying that they would be using gas. However for those of you wanting to take on the DIY projects at home a gasless MIG is more than enough. Gas not only costs you a lot your also introducing problems like porosity due to wind, let's face it will all don't have big workshops at home that can be shut up on a windy day, gasless has the advantage of being able to weld over Galv, Paint and the common surface rust, (I would advise only do this were a grinder can't clean the job though). Unlike Arc welding MIG is very forgiving on your fit ups which is handy when we're starting out. A few tips for those trying home projects
- Clean with a grinder we're you plan to weld makes all the differance
-When welding a thick gauge steel to a light gauge always preheat the heavy gauge item between 50 and 100 deg i.e. (a stub axle if you were building a rear bar)
- Steel contracts when your weld is cooling (twice as much with Stainless Steels) so brace your job with off cuts and don't remove them till it's cooled right down
- If welding a seam, back stepping your weld is a good idea
- When chasing strength weld in a verticle up position if possible, however a bit of practice on scrap will help to fine tune the machine so you don't blow holes in your light gauge material
- It's always a good idea to isolate your batteries before welding on your vehicle
- Another for welding thick gauge to light gauge is don't be afraid to turn your amps up, just be sure to direct your heat at the heavy and wash it across to the light
- If you were fabbing up a set of sliders you would want a decent quality weld, last thing you want is jacking off your sliders and having a weld break and do some uneeded panel damage. So make sure you burn in both edges if you get cold roll your best off grinding it out and having another go
- Spend the extra dollars on a decent wire, you can't beat Lincoln and sometimes Cig Weld

That's a start I could go on and on but that's enough typing for now
Hope this helps


Night shift going a bit slow is it Emu?
 
#32
Mig or Arc dosnt matter only confidence in yourself

Steady 2 down 6 to go
I find I get a great job from a ARC welder being taught welding on the rigs in the Tasman but these days I use a generated gas mig 3 Phase inside or out get the same results it is all in the site prep work.
at home I tried a gasless mig and it was like I was 16 again and first time I picked up the welder lol. I find my little Bunning's special does a great job using WIA 2.5 ml rods and 3.5 case hardening rods just a slower action to get a lot more heat. I recently made a light bar for my roof rack and it turned out just fine and I even stood on it to test it at 100kg no problem. Having a Pacemaker makes it harder to use a ARC welder as I can only do 30 minute stints and then leave it alone for a couple of hours but only when the handbrake is not at home lol.
Regards
Noel H.
:D:D:D:D:D
 
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tankbloke

4x4 Earth Contributer
#33
I have a CIGWELD Arc at home, that I am learning through trial and error(many errors:eek:)
Lucky to have access to both a Mig and Oxy at work.:cool:
 
#35
The reason for my original question is I have a CIG 185? gas/gasless trolley unit, ( set up for gasless atm for rust work on an old car)and my old man is a die hard ARC welding fan. I was talking about making some sliders and rebuilding my trailer, and he got me thinking.
I intend on using the GAS MIG for both, but, as i dont do alot of welding and the old man has been of the tools for 10 years, I wanted to know "modern" advice.
Thanks all for you time and the input.
Good subject : started my working life some 40 + years ago as a welder , so IMO mig with gas for 90 % of your welding quick clean easy & best for lite gauge materials . As others have said good for learners . NO good out in the wind . expensive having gas bottle i.e rent ... if you don't use regularly that's where gas ,less maybe better ?? I had to do a job on a tow hitch the other day so i used the old stick welder ....heavy steel & needs to be 100 % reliable .
 

silkwood

Well-Known Member
#36
While the subject has come up (again!), I'm asking around regarding the best, cheapest :)rolleyes:) option which will let me weld Aluminium. Brother in-law tells me Tig only, guy at work tells me Mig- Gas (Argon) with spool gun. Any opinions? keeping in mind it would be very occasional Ally welding and I want the least expensive (but usable) option.

Cheers,
Mark
 

G_ute

Well-Known Member
#37
I have a gasless MIG and it works fine, but its not 'pretty' and you spend more time cleaning up the splatter. Anti-splatter spray helps as does having the correct lens in your helmet, for gasless.
If I was doing a big project I would get the gas but have not needed it so far.
You can even get SS gasless wire.
 

Albynsw

Well-Known Member
#38
While the subject has come up (again!), I'm asking around regarding the best, cheapest :)rolleyes:) option which will let me weld Aluminium. Brother in-law tells me Tig only, guy at work tells me Mig- Gas (Argon) with spool gun. Any opinions? keeping in mind it would be very occasional Ally welding and I want the least expensive (but usable) option.

Cheers,
Mark
Most of the units are 3 in one doing Mig Tig and stick so you have the option really unless you buy a dedicated unit doing one only
 
#39
You can now buy bottles, no need for rent. Do a swap when empty. I have a spool gun so you can mig aluminium, with argon. You can tig aluminum with dc although you need to use helium. Your work comes out black but cleans up nice. I think the spool gun is a better option, you can use the argon for this and tig. If you have an ac welder, go tig for aluminum.
 
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