Am i missing something?

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Rhett HS

Well-Known Member
#81
Yeah mate ive seen it that deep before. We've rescued people on it a few times and all the rigs were 37s or 40s or 46 inch tyres twin locked..

Was still difficult but we had the mog up front clearing the way on the 46ers then followed by jeep on 40s then 37s.. the guys we resued were on 35s and 37s
Sounds like cool fun if you are prepared for it and its something you enjoy and there's no dead or maimed bodies involved.

Someone mentioned spuds, on that note, some of the attitudes expressed in this thread make me wonder if the world is ruled by couch potatoes.
 

Paddler Ed

Well-Known Member
#83
I'm loathe to use the Daily Fail as a source, but they had some good pictures from the 2013 icy blast in the UK (when that picture of the BMW was from) to counter your Iceland Truck.

1) Look at the gear being used to clear the roads




2) Look at the gear being used to rescue motorists... not 4x4s, but helicopters


3) Look at how stuck one of the LRs is after getting stuck and then 4 more days of snow:


4) I reckon these guys were of the "I've got a 4x4, I can get through" mentality:




However, at the same time, there are people who will go out into the hills with the right gear (ice axes, ropes, crampons etc) and camp:


https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...ringing-chaos-roads-triple-dip-recession.html

By the way, many of those photos are at lower altitude than I am now on the Northern Tablelands.
 

Rhett HS

Well-Known Member
#86
When people feel like they are losing an argument they resort to personal attacks.

Scary that having a discussion generates personal attacks.
 
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mikehzz

Well-Known Member
#89
A very large proportion of Iclanders believe in fairies, the "hidden people". They famously diverted construction of a freeway because there was a large rock believed to be the home fairies, in the way and didn't want to disturb it. They sound like cool people, I'd like to go there, it's on my list. Off road driving is prohibited, heavy fines apply....
 

Albynsw

Well-Known Member
#91
A very large proportion of Iclanders believe in fairies, the "hidden people". They famously diverted construction of a freeway because there was a large rock believed to be the home fairies, in the way and didn't want to disturb it. They sound like cool people, I'd like to go there, it's on my list. Off road driving is prohibited, heavy fines apply....

There are lots of people here that are off with the fairies so they must believe in them too.
 

rogerazz

4x4 Earth Contributer
#93
I am so lucky that there are so many knowledgeable blokes on this thread. I was thinking of my friend wanting to do the CSR, can anyone help? He will be driving a Skoda and arriving from Romania shortly. His vehicle was recently featured in the Bulgarian cross country sedan rally where he came second in a field of two. He assures me that he knows and understands desert conditions because driving in the snow is sort of similar to driving in the sand. Like airing down, carrying a shovel, etc.
Here is a pic for your advise and knowledgable comments regarding any extra options he may need.
old-skoda-100-PFK3PG.jpg

Can anyone help?
 

Rhett HS

Well-Known Member
#94
Huh? Next time i plan a trip i have to google every road i might travel on before i leave home? Thats nuts.

It obvious the best situation is to inform people with detained signs, for people to be smart and not get into too much trouble, and since you can never guarantee 100% safety there will always be situations where things go wrong and you deal with it.

It seems a significant proportion of australians have been manipulated by government greed to want to be tied up with red tape, fees, large fines ($845? and you might not be the slightest problem), restrictions on freedoms, etc.
 

Rhett HS

Well-Known Member
#95
I am so lucky that there are so many knowledgeable blokes on this thread. I was thinking of my friend wanting to do the CSR, can anyone help? He will be driving a Skoda and arriving from Romania shortly. His vehicle was recently featured in the Bulgarian cross country sedan rally where he came second in a field of two. He assures me that he knows and understands desert conditions because driving in the snow is sort of similar to driving in the sand. Like airing down, carrying a shovel, etc.
Here is a pic for your advise and knowledgable comments regarding any extra options he may need. View attachment 61984
Can anyone help?
It appears to have a rear engine so traction could be good. Its a very simple vehicle so easy to repair, and if he rallies it he should be in control of maintenance. Driving that car across the CSR is just the kind of thing The Grand Tour would do, which millions would find entertaining and would wish they could be there for the fun. According to Clarkson he sees himself as extremely lucky.

Except australians are probably planning on banning and fining all fun.
 

boobook

Well-Known Member
#96
Not sure about googling every road Rhett, but you should definitely check conditions in the High Country before venturing into it. Especially as you aren't familiar with it. You will read in lots of places warnings that say conditions change quickly and you should check conditions. Snow, fallen timber, washouts, floods, fire, road works, high winds, seasonal road closures with different opening and closing dates, tracks closed because they're dangerous and need rework all happen all the time. Even snow in Summer. Constant change.

There are literally hundreds of entry and exit tracks into the high country in a remote, large area. You cant expect the various authorities to put up signs everywhere for every event. It would be impossible. That is what the internet is for.

For most, a bit of research goes a long way, for others... well not every person can be babysat by Authorities. Though some seem to expect it.

I just can't imagine going into the High Country without doing some basic trip research a few days beforehand, unless I am sure of the conditions and latest updates. Even though I have been there hundreds of times.


It's basic trip preparation.

Also. lucky Ken the copper from Woods Point didn't catch you. He has little to do and is usually up on that road looking for people without permits and doing breathalizers, I got breathalyzed at 9AM one Friday Morning. He had the whole convey lined up. He got a bunch of hunters for 0.05 and no permits too. They were spewing.



Huh? Next time i plan a trip i have to google every road i might travel on before i leave home? Thats nuts.

It obvious the best situation is to inform people with detained signs, for people to be smart and not get into too much trouble, and since you can never guarantee 100% safety there will always be situations where things go wrong and you deal with it.

It seems a significant proportion of australians have been manipulated by government greed to want to be tied up with red tape, fees, large fines ($845? and you might not be the slightest problem), restrictions on freedoms, etc.
 

Choook

Well-Known Member
#97
Driving that car across the CSR is just the kind of thing The Grand Tour would do, which millions would find entertaining and would wish they could be there for the fun. According to Clarkson he sees himself as extremely lucky.
Are you trying to compare some idiot driving on a closed track in the VHC to 3 knob heads with inflated egos and even more inflated bank balances driving shitbox cars through dangerous places all over the planet backed up by a crew of probably 50 - 60+ people???
They only get to these places because they have the funds to grease enough palms!! If you see them breakdown in an isolated place they are not stranded!!! There is probably a helicopter on standby not to mention the medical team, producers, directors, camera operators, caterers, mechanics, sound engineers, lighting, et al behind the camera in close proximity.
 

Rhett HS

Well-Known Member
#98
Comparing the conditions of a High Country track to the roads in Europe or the USA/Canada is a bit of a red herring:
1) Roads in Europe get ploughed, gritted and generally kept open on a daily basis if they are major arterial roads. If not, they get nothing - our local roads get cleared by the local farmers in their tractors.
2) Some of those roads require chains in certain conditions
3) Some European countries and American/Canadian States/Provinces require winter tyres (not all terrains or mud tyres if they don't have the snow flake on them) which perform very differently to an All Season (even a soft roader OEM tyre with a snow flake)
4) Grip to get moving is different to grip to stopping...
5) They're bitumen roads, not dirt tracks.

We've driven the RWD BMW below in the snow where the 4x4s were not working well; the BMW had winter tyres on all the wheels (that meant we had some steering, braking and go ability) whereas the 4x4s were on ATs. The problem was the 4x4s thought they were invincible so drove normally and got it wrong.
View attachment 61968
(Yes, we drove the car out of that snow - in fact, I took it in preference to the brand new Volvo XC70 that was also in the driveway - it wouldn't climb back up the driveway however, as the snow was too compacted to ball in the sipes in the tyres)

However, both of us are quite used to driving in snow - it has no novelty, and is actually just a pain in the arse after the first 2 or 3 days - and I've spent time in the hills in the snow. That car would go out with a load of blankets in the back, a snow shovel and a tow rope, as well as a flask and spare fuel if a longer journey.

Your approach Rhett to the snow shows why it's so dangerous NOT to have roads closed:
1) Most Australian first aid courses are more used to dealing with hyperthermia as opposed to hypothermia - Aussie's don't understand how dangerous the cold is. Hypothermia sets in really quickly, and is really hard to recover from if not done properly.
2) Navigating in snow is bloody hard, especially where there are hills etc involved and you can't get it wrong at the edge
3) Walking in snow is hard, much more than walking normally - we did a hill once that was a comfortable 4hr walk in the summer, it was about 6hrs in the snow.
4) Rescuers don't enjoy getting called out to preventable rescues... and they certainly don't like going to preventable recoveries (there is a difference in Mountain Rescue language there)
5) If it's a valuable route across the HC, there is a good reason to close it, and that might be it's more important to the locals than to the tourists, so bugger the tourists (or, as they sometimes get called in the UK, Tourons)
6) Yes, snow is pretty; yes, snow is a novelty in Australia. No, it's not a good idea to make unnecessary journeys in it. We see it here in the New England; every time there's a chance of snow there is an equally big flurry of people trying to find out where the snow is - and they're travelling from Brisbane or the coast to get to it. Is that really necessary? Well, given that the RMS will close some of the roads because of snow (at about 1340m) it's not really worth the risk.
Revision 1......

*WARNING*
During X period of the year this road can be very hazardous. It can involve the following conditions:
1. Snow up to X mm deep.
2. Ice
3. Temperatures below X degrees celcius
4. Winds in excess of X km/h
5. Fog and whiteouts where visibility can be less than X m (?)
6. Numerous fallen trees across the road, which may be buried under snow, or may fall and block your exit
7. Patchy mobile service, at best

Vehicles have slipped off this road and fallen down cliffs. Extreme care is advised. If you decide to drive this road, it is recommended that you have the following for your safety:
1. Experience in driving in hazardous conditions
2. A reliable 4wd vehicle with recovery equipment and enough fuel if you decide or need to turn around. Tyre chains are recommended.
3. Adequate food, water, clothing, bedding and first aid in the case of incident. Reliably accessible information on how to treat hypothermia
4. Someone independent that knows your travel plans
5. The expectation that you may not be able to safely complete the road and will turn around, and may not be able to exit due to fallen trees or road conditions
 

Rhett HS

Well-Known Member
#99
Are you trying to compare some idiot driving on a closed track in the VHC to 3 knob heads with inflated egos and even more inflated bank balances driving shitbox cars through dangerous places all over the planet backed up by a crew of probably 50 - 60+ people???
They only get to these places because they have the funds to grease enough palms!! If you see them breakdown in an isolated place they are not stranded!!! There is probably a helicopter on standby not to mention the medical team, producers, directors, camera operators, caterers, mechanics, sound engineers, lighting, et al behind the camera in close proximity.
It wasnt made specific whether the romanian would be travelling alone or not, and whether he would be taking a comprehensive list of spares and tools or not.

Are you saying old cars should be banned from the CSR?

I read recently that a rescue guy that covers that area deliberately drives an older vehicle, and the birdsville recovery truck is also fairly old.
 

Rhett HS

Well-Known Member
People are accusing me of not doing enough pre trip preparation. Why? I didnt have a significant problem due to the amount of pre trip prep that i did. I decided to refuel at Eildon and had a quarter of a tank left when i got there, which takes me a long way.
 
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