Am i missing something?

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Rhett HS

Well-Known Member
#1
I was recently in the VHC and wanted to drive the Licola to Jamieson Rd. On the map it looks like a significant and key route. I wanted to exit on the north side of the VHC, and i wanted to find some snow. Woods Point and Licola were not options for the purchase of fuel, so my route options were reducing.

As i was leaving Licola i saw a little sign saying i need to be a member of one of a specific list of 4wd Clubs. There was no phone reception, and the Licola store was shut for another week, so i couldnt obtain this at short notice, plus i hear it costs around $100.

I had a capable 4wd vehicle with mud tyres, a winch, two chainsaws, shovel, hilift jack, extensive toolkit etc, heaps of food and water, heaps of warm clothes and bedding, uhf, telstra mobile coverage (and yes there is reception in many places along the way including Mt Skene even when its raining and snowing), i have extensive bush and 4wding experience, have lived in a somewhat remote town that gets 9 inches of snow per year (i used to collect timber in the snow), i have an MC drivers license, and familiarity with bush survival. I told someone my itinerary.

Climbing Everest would be a challenge, driving this road, would be fun, for me. I would feel at home even if there were 50 trees across the road i had to navigate (recent storm).

So whats with the ridiculous regulatory imposition? Am i missing something?
 

smitty_r51

Well-Known Member
#2
If it is anything like the Brindabella it is because you get old man Jones heads up on a formed dirt road to see the snow and gets stuck or falls over the side... Then you have to send up a ranger rescue squad which puts them at risk.

Taking to our local ranger he said they have no problems with the properly equipped vehicles and skills, they don't have to be rescued... But they can't put exemptions in for person a or group b... So everyone gets banned and the gates come down as soon as the weather turns.
 

Rhett HS

Well-Known Member
#3
People die in car crashes, do we ban cars? No. Maybe you should have to be a registered stuntman?

Will becoming a member of a 4wd club online make people safer to drive this road?

Will fools even notice or care about the little sign?

How about a big warning sign informing people? Like elsewhere. That will get a lot of people thinking and scare off the ill prepared. Tell them they could be faced with up to x inches of snow. Ice. Many fallen trees across the road. Wet and slushy road surface. Subzero temperatures. Communication issues. Ask them on the sign what they have in their car to cope if their car spins off the road or breaks down, or gets trapped by fallen trees.
 

Bomber2012

Well-Known Member
#4
So whats with the ridiculous regulatory imposition? Am i missing something?
Its a well know road closure over winter Rhett , you should have researched your trip better .
Will becoming a member of a 4wd club online make people safer to drive this road?
In short yes , 4WD clubs travel in a convoy so if someone does need assistance they are not on their own .
How about a big warning sign informing people?
Should have researched your trip .

The road closure is in place because people (like you) go up there un prepared , get in trouble then put emergency service workers at risk having to rescue them . You can rant and rave and carry on as much as you like or accept the fact you &&$&$& up , you were obviously unprepared not knowing about a road closure that is common knowledge in the off road fraternity . Next time you head into a area you have no idea about it might pay to research your trip and you will find all the info you need .
 
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phs

Well-Known Member
#5
That route requires an application to be submitted with 4wd Victoria for approval

I could be wrong but fairly sure you also need to be an affiliated 4wd Victoria club to apply as well
 

Rhett HS

Well-Known Member
#6
I think most people that live in areas that get snow would laugh at the rule. Its only there because snow is uncommon in australia.

Tell the story to an Alaskan, Canadian, Icelander, northern european, argentinian, etc, even someone from the UK(?), you will give them a hearty chuckle.

I lived in a house on a block that would get 9 inches once a year, and i would drive my falcon around the area to enjoy it all. I had to heat the house 24/7 for 5 months of the year. Skene in a 4wd is piss easy right now, try going along remote logging tracks in a falcon with a trailer. Its all do-able safely if you learn what you need to.

Right now its only a 4wd track in order to get over the logs, or you can just get them off the road. There is enough traffic to give easy rescues like any other 2wd route. If they didnt restrict traffic there would be even more potential rescuers around. To rescue people from what, that you dont get in heaps of other places around the high country? Cold weather and some snow? Ouch.
 
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peterfermtech

Well-Known Member
#7
Mt Skene is well and truly above the snow line which means that snow depths build up. Unlike the Alpine way which has continuous snow clearing there is no active winter maintenance to keep the snow off the road or even keep the levels down. A single storm (as in May) can bring 90cm of snow with drifts over the road that could be double that. On top of that overnight temperatures can drop well below freezing. Did you have chains to handle the ice? Given that this is a road that a lot of people looking at maps would interpret as a simple 2wd then I think closing it is fair enough.
regards
 

phs

Well-Known Member
#8
I think most people that live in areas that get snow would laugh at the rule. Its only there because snow is uncommon in australia.

Tell the story to an Alaskan, Canadian, Icelander, northern european, argentinian, etc, even someone from the UK(?), you will give them a hearty chuckle.

I lived in a house on a block that would get 9 inches once a year, and i would drive my falcon around the area to enjoy it all. I had to heat the house 24/7 for 5 months of the year. Skene in a 4wd is piss easy right now, try going along remote logging tracks in a falcon with a trailer. Its all do-able safely if you learn what you need to.

Right now its only a 4wd track in order to get over the logs, or you can just get them off the road. There is enough traffic to give easy rescues like any other 2wd route. If they didnt restrict traffic there would be even more potential rescuers around. To rescue people from what, that you dont get in heaps of other places around the high country? Cold weather and some snow? Ouch.
No doubt they would laugh,

But People in Australia are not accustomed to the snow and kept driving up there in winter unaware the snow keeps getting deeper and a lot got stuck
The police regularly went in to rescue them until one day they got stuck too and apparently spent the night in there bus.....

So they closed it in winter
 
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Rhett HS

Well-Known Member
#9
Yeah, i accept there are reasons, but i dont think its the right solution, on what i have learned so far. I think education is the solution. A big sign that tells people all this. Like there are for other areas, that are much more remote than skene.

I did enough research to know that skene requires permits, but i wasnt going to spend $100 that i figured would unquestionably be a waste if i didnt drive there, and a waste even if i did drive there. The government shouldnt make policy based around people having rigid schedules, experienced people (and inexperienced) often dont do things that way. Same for camping in national parks and site allocations.

We bemoan the younger generation being obese and glued to smartphones, at the same time as taking away the otherwise exciting things. People like Sir Edmund Hilary are less likely to grow out of a cotton wool culture.
 

Bomber2012

Well-Known Member
#11
Yeah, i accept there are reasons, but i dont think its the right solution, on what i have learned so far. I think education is the solution. A big sign that tells people all this. Like there are for other areas, that are much more remote than skene.

I did enough research to know that skene requires permits, but i wasnt going to spend $100 that i figured would unquestionably be a waste if i didnt drive there, and a waste even if i did drive there. The government shouldnt make policy based around people having rigid schedules, experienced people (and inexperienced) often dont do things that way. Same for camping in national parks and site allocations.

We bemoan the younger generation being obese and glued to smartphones, at the same time as taking away the otherwise exciting things. People like Sir Edmund Hilary are less likely to grow out of a cotton wool culture.

If you realised before your trip that permits were required for Mt Skene why kick up a song and dance about it now ? Were you just going to drive it and ignore the permit ? because thats what it sounds like .
No phone service in Licola ????? Wrong again Rhett , there is a pay phone at the shop .....
You obviously know nothing about this particular area yet think you have all the answers , stop wingeing and accept your wrong , the rules were put in place by people that have a better understanding of the place than some know all pest from 1000km's away .
 

discomatt

Well-Known Member
#15
But if you did get into a situation that needed reverse you would expect others to put there lives on hold, risk there well being and spend massive $$ to come and rescue you...
Um nothing wrong with this picture NOT
 

Rhett HS

Well-Known Member
#16
But if you did get into a situation that needed reverse you would expect others to put there lives on hold, risk there well being and spend massive $$ to come and rescue you...
Um nothing wrong with this picture NOT
Gimme a break, mine is tuned, reverse torque limiting is gone. Even if some genie popped out of a bottle, waved his wand and put it back to std, i could still reverse out of most situations, or use my shovel to remove snow, or my gloved hands, or use my winch, or my hi lift jack, or pour some chainsaw petrol on the snow, light it and melt it away :D
 
#18
I was recently in the VHC and wanted to drive the Licola to Jamieson Rd. On the map it looks like a significant and key route. I wanted to exit on the north side of the VHC, and i wanted to find some snow. Woods Point and Licola were not options for the purchase of fuel, so my route options were reducing.

As i was leaving Licola i saw a little sign saying i need to be a member of one of a specific list of 4wd Clubs. There was no phone reception, and the Licola store was shut for another week, so i couldnt obtain this at short notice, plus i hear it costs around $100.

I had a capable 4wd vehicle with mud tyres, a winch, two chainsaws, shovel, hilift jack, extensive toolkit etc, heaps of food and water, heaps of warm clothes and bedding, uhf, telstra mobile coverage (and yes there is reception in many places along the way including Mt Skene even when its raining and snowing), i have extensive bush and 4wding experience, have lived in a somewhat remote town that gets 9 inches of snow per year (i used to collect timber in the snow), i have an MC drivers license, and familiarity with bush survival. I told someone my itinerary.

Climbing Everest would be a challenge, driving this road, would be fun, for me. I would feel at home even if there were 50 trees across the road i had to navigate (recent storm).

So whats with the ridiculous regulatory imposition? Am i missing something?

Rhett, a little history about this might explain the current situation better. Victoria Police actually had this road seasonally closed for a couple of years, as they had a few issues with people ending needing rescuing from it, including a couple of Police officers that went to rescue some people.

The reason that 4WD Victoria affiliated club members can apply for a permit is that 4WD Victoria convinced the Police and the local council that their members would be prepared enough to travel this road in winter without needing rescuing from the police or SES. That is why 4WD Victoria manage the permit scheme. If the scheme were to be abolished, I think you will find that the road will be closed to all traffic during the seasonal road closure period. Also, even if you are a member, don't assume you will be able to get a permit at short notice. They limit the number of vehicles using the road to a certain number every weekend, and even with this restriction, I've heard of some nasty traffic jams near the summit.

Regards
Craig Murray
 

Rhett HS

Well-Known Member
#20
They are currently relying on a small sign. Its easily missed and doesnt tell you anything about the road conditions.

My suggestion is to replace it with a large, fully informative sign about the road conditions, and let people decide if they want to use the road.

Otherwise we are headed towards floaty chairs.

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