70 series production officially paused.

GLee

Active Member
Congratulations
Will be interested to hear your thoughts after putting a few K on her
The gearbox feels solid. Have to get use to the gearing as 1st is dead low, 2nd is low and everything else is low. For tight 90 degree corners I would normally go onto 2nd, but on LC78, I either go to 3rd or higher revs on 2nd. Cannot down change gear and right-foot brake and apply accelerator blip, as brake is way higher than the accelerator pedal.

I've modified the gear shift (to bring it back to an inch, and slightly higher). The gear shift throw, even before the shift lever modification, was larger between 2nd and 3rd.
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A few times going up from 2nd to 3rd I would hit the space between 1st and 3rd. Just need to get use to the lever throws to obtain consistent precision.

I don't think it is possible to stall this vehicle! Even at less than walking pace on 2nd, I was able to pull away without struggle. 1st is only for initial 'inertia'/pretend-to-get-away, then straight into 2nd.
 
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Albynsw

Well-Known Member
Damn. I should have placed another 2x orders as an investment!

I mate bought two, did a build on the first one and selling without driving it and keeping the second one. Reckons he will make 20-30k on it
 

cam04

Well-Known Member
1st is for hill starts and towing trailers, otherwise very optional. Most modern manual diesels have anti stall, so rather than balancing throttle/clutch off the line like a car we just gently dump the clutch in second at idle then accelerate once the clutch is out (light trucks). Don't tell anyone but I was taught that by a LR dealer when trying to love a 130 puma twin cab enough to buy one - being unstallable was one of their selling points. It is a different way of doing it but saves the driveline.
 

LongRoad2Go

Well-Known Member
1st is for hill starts and towing trailers, otherwise very optional. Most modern manual diesels have anti stall, so rather than balancing throttle/clutch off the line like a car we just gently dump the clutch in second at idle then accelerate once the clutch is out (light trucks). Don't tell anyone but I was taught that by a LR dealer when trying to love a 130 puma twin cab enough to buy one - being unstallable was one of their selling points. It is a different way of doing it but saves the driveline.

It kinda surprising people need to be told that.

If someone is accustomed to driving manual vehicles (as opposed to steering automatics), then choosing a gear based on revs is almost mandatory ... it's all feel, vision and sound. That's why I've always owned manuals = much more feel for what the vehicle is doing and control when it's anticipated.
 

boobook

Well-Known Member
Taking orders and then changing the price before delivery should be illegal. They're all doing it now.

This country has crappy consumer protection laws.
 

Albynsw

Well-Known Member
Taking orders and then changing the price before delivery should be illegal. They're all doing it now.

This country has crappy consumer protection laws.

In the USA they don’t have to stick to retail price and are currently charging manufacturers recommended price plus a dealer margin of 5 to 10%, they are price gouging
It is illegal to do it here.
With high consumer demand and low stock levels we are getting screwed over
 

cam04

Well-Known Member
Taking orders and then changing the price before delivery should be illegal. They're all doing it now.

This country has crappy consumer protection laws.
If there were published rise and fall rates like in commercial construction the price could change and protect both party's rights without the need for contingency allowances. To be fair, who knows what the price of building a 78 in two years time will be? Not that I think for a second that manufacturers give two shits about anyone but themselves and will always take the rort. Afterall toyota have always priced according to what the market will stomach so no surprises there.
 
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LongRoad2Go

Well-Known Member
It appears to be the same with the Mahindra - it's about the same price here as in South Africa, but in India where it is manufactured, the thing costs about half as much (when using straight currency conversion). So, when tens of thousands of them are loaded into ships, at some point across the Indian Ocean, they magically double in price? Think we're all being 'shanghaied' and taken for a ride no matter what brand we consider.
 

LurchWA

Active Member
I got told the other day that we should expect Toyota to put on hold more 300 series in line with other models.
We ordered ours in April so relatively new kids on the block
Hoping it doesnt happen but well prepared for the eventuality if it does.
 

discomatt

Well-Known Member
Everything is going up due to covid actions, no reason cars shouldn’t be different, pretty crap how Toyota treat their “guests “ though
Personally I don’t think that anyone willing to fork out well over 100k on a 4wd then more than likely spend another small fortune on mods will car about a measly 3000 especially as how when they get it home it would be worth 20 k more than what the dealer is selling them new although that won’t be a long standing position
 

smitty_r51

Well-Known Member
According to Reuters, Toyota may be forced to shutter its 10 production lines at seven Japanese factories for a period of up to 12 days as a result of an ongoing chip shortage. While supplies of some chips may be improving, shortages of other components continue to dog the auto industry. Reuters reports that Toyota now expects to produce roughly 800,000 vehicles globally in October, around 100,000 fewer than expected. In July the automaker blamed a combination of semiconductor shortages and COVID-19 for ongoing production challenges, which have stretched for months now.
 

G_ute

Well-Known Member
Because so many components are being sourced from Chinese factories and ports.
And the CCP continues to cripple their own economy and not solely due to locking down millions of workers but other policies like estranging thier foreign 'partnerships', many of whom are leaving China having been burnt.
 

LurchWA

Active Member
Because so many components are being sourced from Chinese factories and ports.
And the CCP continues to cripple their own economy and not solely due to locking down millions of workers but other policies like estranging thier foreign 'partnerships', many of whom are leaving China having been burnt.
Not only china mate. We recently bought a new UD truck and it has wiring looms and components from Morocco, Greece, China, Japan and a fewq others. Blew me away to be honest but certainly brings the supply issues into perspective
 
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