#5 Australian Military Box Trailer Camping Conversion

texaus

New Member
Youtube Link -1st Video

Figured I'd document the conversion of this #5 box trailer into my camping trailer. I've already upgraded the tyres, but am now considering the upgrade of the axle & leaf springs plus electric breaks. I'm a handy sort of guy, but just not sure what the pro-cons would be just yet. My existing axle doesn't have the brake mounting flanges welded to it, and I'm not sure how hard this would be to do. Any comments welcomed. Thank you.
 

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Triton14

Well-Known Member
Nice solid looking trailer.
Not sure about Qld but in NSW you only have to brake a trailer if its 750kg+
Will all the combined weight go over that?
Otherwise I wouldnt bother with the brake myself as I dont see the point really, just more stuff requiring service.
 
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G_ute

Well-Known Member
I am sure that if the trailers needed brakes the army would have specified them.
While the original design is old they would make changes if they were needed.
 

texaus

New Member
Nice solid looking trailer.
Not sure about Qld but in NSW you only have to brake a trailer if its 750kg+
Will all the combined weight go over that?
Otherwise I wouldnt bother with the brake myself as I dont see the point really, just more stuff requiring service.
Yes, I'm likely close now. I've still got a refrigerator, water tank, and some slide out drawers to go.
 

texaus

New Member
I am sure that if the trailers needed brakes the army would have specified them.
While the original design is old they would make changes if they were needed.
Agreed. The trailer in its original state doesn't require brakes. It's the additional weight that's being added that change the load and necessitate the brakes.
 

cam04

Well-Known Member
I can’t see a close up of the axle, looks like 50mm round? Ford SL bearings? You can order a brand new axle, any offset you want with brake mounts for a couple of hundred $ including new U bolts. Just need to take the dimensions off that one, or upgrade the axle but I wouldn’t think that would be necessary with that little weight. Active fabrications Beenleigh will do it all online.
 

Triton14

Well-Known Member
Yes, I'm likely close now. I've still got a refrigerator, water tank, and some slide out drawers to go.
Whats the GVM rating on the trailer??

I have been looking at some auction sites at ex mil trailers & they all seem to have a specific rating.
I know some of this will have to do with braking but still they will have to have a max capacity.

If you change that do you need an engineers cert, just curious??
 

Mick_Marsh

Active Member
The ATM of these trailers is about 900kg, and they are over engineered.
Of course, in modern times, to achieve the ATM of 900kg you will need brakes. I would recommend you buy a whole new axle with the brakes already attached. Electric brakes would be easiest to install.
You should consider shock absorbers as well. They are notoriously unstable trailers that tend to turn turtle. The over engineered stiff springs could also be made a little less harsh.

I think an engineers certificate will also be required if you are changing the registration details.

Mine is one of the rare ones that has hydraulic brakes, shock absorbers and a tailgate from factory.
 

Hoyks

Well-Known Member
I am sure that if the trailers needed brakes the army would have specified them.
While the original design is old they would make changes if they were needed.
The military isn't always constrained by such things as ADR's (especially back in the '60's when these things were designed), unlike us mortals, but they also generally overengineer stuff because if you say 500kg, then some digger will stick 700 in it.

"It's role is to transport general cargo and equipment up to 500kg both on road and cross country...". So a tare weight of 250kg is probably realistic and there is your 750kg.

If you want to register it and go over 750, then brakes will be required.

They were a bit tippy though, more than one has ended upside down due to a rock on the racing line of an off camber dirt corner.
 

Mick_Marsh

Active Member
The military isn't always constrained by such things as ADR's (especially back in the '60's when these things were designed), unlike us mortals, but they also generally overengineer stuff because if you say 500kg, then some digger will stick 700 in it.

"It's role is to transport general cargo and equipment up to 500kg both on road and cross country...". So a tare weight of 250kg is probably realistic and there is your 750kg.

If you want to register it and go over 750, then brakes will be required.

They were a bit tippy though, more than one has ended upside down due to a rock on the racing line of an off camber dirt corner.
They have a tare weight of 360kg. They were required to carry 500kg up hill and down dale.
As you say, they were built before ADRs. Well, most if them were.
 
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