4wd accreditation Courses

Have u attended an accredited 4wd course?

  • Yes

    Votes: 21 39.6%
  • No

    Votes: 32 60.4%

  • Total voters
    53

Swaggie

Moderator
I think they're a great idea for people that DONT have the confidence to go out and people that need refreshment course,I also agree that we dont know everything...There's plenty of stuff on Youtube and the Internet these days that explain what to do and not what to do...

I am confident that i have the right tools and accessories to get out of a situation..Used it last week because it rained overnight on a track that was steep and rocky,had to winch me and my mates 100series out too,3.5 hours of our morning gone :eek::eek:..

THERE is NOTHING better than "OUT IN THE FIELD EXPERIENCE" and if you can go with experienced people that will steer you in the right direction...

Whats written on paper doesn't always pan out in the bush...Keep common sense and a strict-ed safety regime and you'll come out the better...
 

Outrage

4x4 Earth Contributer
Had been 4bying for about 2 yrs, opportunity came through work to go on a course (all paid for being with work). It wasn't an intensive course as it was aimed at our business level.

Even so, I still learned bits here and there on different aspects of 4bying/recovery. Not necessarily that what I already knew was wrong, but there was a slightly better way to do something.

Other people have mentioned this, but one thing the instructor stated, there are many people out there with 'years' of experience, but those can be 'years' of experience at doing things the 'wrong' way.

Accredited courses have there place and are well worth it, they teach you the 'right' way. Not everyone has the money for them though.
 

scodon

New Member
I haven't done an accredited civilian course, however I have done one through work which was a day out in the bush doing some basic stuff including a few recoveries, hill climbs etc.

When I get the time to get out in the bush, I learn something different every time :) I'm not sure paying hundreds of dollars to do a course is for me, however it may be right for others....
 

xf087

Member
I'm currently doing my course with the st4wdc here in Canberra

last weekend spent camping on and driving the tracks on the club property and next weekend out into the brindies ..................... and so far have enjoyed the experience ( have not bent the Triton yet)


Looks like next Sunday will be an interesting day as the weatherman says that we could get up to 200mm of rain between now and Sunday

with the club we have to pay about $230 on top of our membership fees when we first join ( one off payment) for our basic training course but after that there is no other fees for the other courses run by the club for members ( winching and recovery and sand and water driving courses).
 

rigga

New Member
I have never done a 4wd course and would never pay to do one. I would probably find it interesting though if i had the opportunity to do a free one, and i'd certainly enjoy teaching them too.

I do beleive they have a place for those who know nothing. I have seen and heard story's of people doing some absolutely ridiculous things with 4by's and winches. Common sense is not always as 'common' as it's name suggests, and magazine articles are not always as accurate in their reporting as many would like to think.

I am an experienced rigger and crane operator by trade so i know my way around winches and straps, snatch blocks, etc. very well. Some of the things i see and read on a daily basis makes me cringe. I have seen my mates nearly roll over vehicles purely by winching from the wrong direction, and not utilising snatch blocks and snotters to change the direction of pull.
It always alarms me whenever i keep reading articles and posts written by the ignorant who do not understand the meaning of SWL or WLL as opposed to the breaking strength printed on popular brand snatch straps, etc.

I learnt some lessons the hard way, but fortunately my mechanical aptitude and above-mentioned skills have seen me safely out of most situations.

It was just recently that a workmate asked me about 4wdriving. He's just recently bought an 80series which he intends to take around Australia after retirement. I began to explain a few things and before i knew it i had conducted a few lessons on things that seem so basic to me but he had no idea about.
For guys like him and his wife a 4wd course would be invaluable. I explained to him the importance of lower tyre pressures, how, when and why to deflate and to what pressure, how sand and snow responds and compacts with and without momentum, wheel placement on rocks, reading terrain, knowing where diff pumpkins and other vulnerable undercarriage items are, where and what to winch from, and what to use and how to use it, how to use a snatch strap, different radio and antenna types for different terrain, map reading and gps use, the importance of treading lightly and use of tree protectors, etc. Then he needed to know camping basics and what products to pack, how to pack them, tools to carry, tyres to use, etc.
It's amazing that what seems 'natural' to some of us is very foreign to many.

Some people will benefit greatly from a 4wd course, but not all of us need to do one.
 

mrfelix

New Member
This is a bit long, read it or skip over if you dislike reading. Moderators if this is inappropriate delete it or move it, if it is too far off topic remove.

Note; I am retired and not full time teaching now (63 years old). I live in the USA and not Australia. I have been reading post here since May 2008 and generally reply directly to the person and not on the form.

I do not like government regulations (Rules) telling me what to do anymore then anyone else (I probably dislike it more then the majority). Why do we have regulations??? Seriously.... please take a moment and ask yourself, Why...?

Rules!!! As a child we heard our parents say do not touch the hot frying pan. We listened and still touched it, they were right, it was hot. We learned the hard (or hot) way.

You're not a member of the tea party are you mate ?
 

1 red gu

4x4 Earth Contributer
i totally agree a training course is a good thing
i did a course with a 4wd club and it was only around the $200 dollar mark
not shore if i would fork out $600 for one though

the best things i got out of it was stall starts up and down steep hills (I've seen many people panic in this situation:eek:)
the many different forms of recovering a car from snatching to winching and everything in between, (and how to do it safely)
it is amazing what you can do with a high lift jack!!! if all else fail's :eek::eek::)

i think its important to know how a recovery situation works so everyone is on the same page and knows what to do.
weather it be running winch cable, winch extension straps, tree trunk protectors, drag chains. using snatch blocks or just in a simple snatch
not overloading a strap or cable by driving to fast or to slow when winching is a thing everyone needs to know before tackling any hard track becouce you could just save the life of someone helping you or someones hard earned cash in equipment

i think i have used every thing i was told and more but there's nothing like putting it in to practice out on the trails :D:D
cheers
 
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Big Matt

Active Member
i think its important to know how a recovery situation works so everyone is on the same page and knows what to do.
weather it be running winch cable, winch extension straps, tree trunk protectors, drag chains. using snatch blocks or just in a simple snatch
not overloading a strap or cable by driving to fast or to slow when winching is a thing everyone needs to know before tackling any hard track becouce you could just save the life of someone helping you or someones hard earned cash in equipment

I sort of agree with that, but not in all cases. I agree that people have a basic knowledge at least of recoveries etc helps make stuff run smoother and in some cases safer however Ive come across a few people doing stuff they probably shouldn't have been doing because they were armed with a little knowledge and no experience, but because they had done a "course" they felt they were well prepared to tackle the challenges in front of them.

A little knowledge can be a dangerous thing

Also how often do you get into a situation like you get put in when doing a recovery course, it still requires some experience and the ability to look at a situation and determine the best or safest way to preform the recovery at hand. Same goes for driving harder or different lines on tracks, they are always different to what you might learn on. In these situations nothing beats seat time out on the tracks

THERE is NOTHING better than "OUT IN THE FIELD EXPERIENCE" and if you can go with experienced people that will steer you in the right direction...

Whats written on paper doesn't always pan out in the bush...Keep common sense and a strict-ed safety regime and you'll come out the better...

Agreed, pretty much my point above
 

frenchiexj

New Member
KISS
Read slowly; Most people do not know, that they do not know or what they do not know!

Not all 4X4 instructors are good teachers and not all teachers are good 4X4 instructors!

You're not a member of the tea party are you mate ?
"mrfelix" Let's not talk politics on the form. Look for a private message.

Just because a person owns a winch dose not mean they have a clue how to use it safely. As with what "rigga" said "It always alarms me whenever i keep reading articles and posts written by the ignorant who do not understand the meaning of SWL or WLL as opposed to the breaking strength printed on popular brand snatch straps, etc." It sounds like rigga knows his stuff! Maybe he can do some training. I apologize if I am putting you on the spot.
A GOOD instructor covers these important points in the class.

Retired dose not mean that I do not still teach. I feel safety never retires! This coming weekend I will be doing another Free winch safety class at the TDS Safari, in California, USA. Why? Because if I can save one person from getting hurt or a vehicle needlessly damaged it is worth it to me.

I am not familiar with all the cost to take your classes in Australia. It sounds like they are about $600 each, about double what we get here for group classes of up to 5 vehicles.

What price is a life worth?
 

Terri

New Member
I Have grown up on catle stations in far north QLD and the NT ,But I never owned a 4x4 till now and I think of myself as a quik learner .the thing I want to say is IF thers some one whos done it more often than I have I like to pick his brain for all the info I can scrounge ,I bellive none of US know so mutch that we cant learn anything new from someone aLLSES EXPIRIENCE,All good the more learning we can do the better ,allso evryone sees a situation compleatly different to me or you ,all good ,so when and where is the next school
 

tankbloke

4x4 Earth Contributer
Agree with Swaggie and Big Matt, I have learnt in the field from others, watching and learning.
Sometimes learning from my own errors, but that's all part of it.
Have not done a course and don't see the need for me to do one, but each to their own.
 

cloughcarib

Well-Known Member
I've never done a course(which is obvious when you see me drive), and most of my experience has come from going out with patient people with heaps of experience, as well as occasionally working out what does not work on my own:eek:

Not sure about anyone else, but I learn better when in a situation relevant to what I'm learning. Each time I've been on a 'real' track, it can change from one week to the next, so, to me, it is most important to know my vehicle and it's/my limits. I love watching the way other drivers/vehicles approach a track, and gain as much as I can from their experience.

I have met a few people who don't learn this way and would prefer (and benefit more from) structured guidance.
 

itlldoo

Well-Known Member
all good in theory but i saw a reply that, HOW MUCH TO SAVE A LIFE !!!!! with some dogooders its __how much can you charge to save a life.__ if its all about saving people you would have a better responce and higher attendence at such courses when registration of such vehicles comes with a training weekend. can't believe you can get your licence in a auto Mini, drive for three years and then buy yourself a large 4wd hook up a 3 ton caravan and go for your life without any further training, should we pay for that training? I say we already do, higher rego cost , higher insurance costs, we use more fuel than small cars thus pay more tax, where dose it stop, im part of a 4wd club we do charity runs all the time, we clean up our bush when we are out and about we keep fire trails clear for the emergency services(the ones that don't have gates that is) we are not out there to damage our cars and or the bush we are out there because we love it. but of course if people like it they can charge for it, its the way our leaders think; if it was up to them we would all be made to stay at home and look at the bush thru google GREAT:rolleyes:
Me i like to explore; i understand common sense and will not put myself , my trusty 80 or my family in danger to get to the top of a hill; i still want to get home.
should there be courses YES should they charge for the courses NO it should come with the car rego.
My bit said; happy exploring and be careful if you have doubt dont do it unless you have company just in case;)
 

twisty

Member
I'm currently doing my course with the st4wdc here in Canberra

x2. Join a club that has a basic course and do it. Yeah ... I know ... some can't afford it ...sorry, but I think it's worth saving for.

Nationally recognised course. Up to date technical information. Theory followed immediately by practical appliaction. Your own instructor sitting beside you during all practical. Great people with a "tread softly" attitude and hundreds of years experience.

But if you don't want to do a course, then don't.
 
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cptmud

New Member
Any form of training can only be helpfull, Yes you can go out and learn by trial and error, you can learn by watching videos and reading books. I think it all comes down to how you want the public to see that 4wders take their sport seriously, If places like 4wd clubs and forums advocate that training is a good thing, then it will go a long way to show the politicians, the media and the general public that we are serious about doing the right thing.

Forums and clubs can arrange training at a greatly reduced cost to their members as the trainers will know they will have a full group.
 
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