2018 Mitzy MQ Triton / Easy Select vs Super Select

#1
Hey all,

New to the whole 4x4ing and would like to get an understanding of something.
I have a 2018 MQ Triton 4x4 (Easy Select), which means I have 2H, 4H & 4L.

When I put it in 4H (NOT 4HLC) I'm assuming that this does not lock the Center Diff? If so what does it lock?
Was also curious as to whether it was possibly to upgrade the drive train to a Super Select in order to get 4HLC & 4LLC

Wanting to upgrade the drive train to be able to go four wheel driving in more tougher areas.
The 4H definitely gets me places but I could go further and much make it much easier with an CDL and rear diff locker I believe.

Any help appreciated, cheers!
 

mikehzz

Well-Known Member
#2
Easy select doesn't have a centre diff, it just has the transfer case like most other 4wd's. When you put it in 4wd the front and rear are locked together via the transfer case so you'll wind up if you use it on a high traction surface. The only upgrade you need is front and/or rear diff locks.
 
#6
Easy select doesn't have a centre diff, it just has the transfer case like most other 4wd's. When you put it in 4wd the front and rear are locked together via the transfer case so you'll wind up if you use it on a high traction surface. The only upgrade you need is front and/or rear diff locks.
I can get front and rear diff locks that's fine, but am I missing out on much not having a center diff to lock?
 

mikehzz

Well-Known Member
#7
I can get front and rear diff locks that's fine, but am I missing out on much not having a center diff to lock?
Mate , there's no centre diff in the car. You only have the transfer case which isn't a differential. When you select 4H it engages the transfer case and sends power to the front wheels which then start rotating at the same speed as the rear wheels. This is bad on a tar road but good off road. It is the same as having a locked centre diff. To my knowledge there's only 2 mainstream utes with a centre diff, the Super Select Triton and the Amarok....I could be wrong there and stand to be corrected.
 
#8
Mate , there's no centre diff in the car. You only have the transfer case which isn't a differential. When you select 4H it engages the transfer case and sends power to the front wheels which then start rotating at the same speed as the rear wheels. This is bad on a tar road but good off road. It is the same as having a locked centre diff. To my knowledge there's only 2 mainstream utes with a centre diff, the Super Select Triton and the Amarok....I could be wrong there and stand to be corrected.
Yes I understand that there is no center diff in the car.... i have the easy select not the super select. I could still install diff lokkas for front and rear.... but what I'm asking is am I missing out on much by not have a center diff to lock. Would I be better upgrading to a 4x4 with a CDL or just installing a rear diff lokka
 
#10
4H in your easy select is the equivalent of 4HLC in a Super select.

The advantage to having a centre diff is that you can send drive to all wheels on sealed roads without experiencing driveline wind up. Great on wet tarmac.

The best option for offroad high-range driving is already built into your transfer case. You will see no gains off road by having a centre diff which has to be locked anyway.
 
#11
Essentially if you have the super select you would be able to use the car in four-wheel-drive on bitumen.....like an Awd Subaru. I drove my Triton In this mode every single time it rained especially if I was towing. It’s particularly handy if you’re running a tire that’s not suited to wet bitumen where it gives you a little bit more confidence.
 
#12
Essentially if you have the super select you would be able to use the car in four-wheel-drive on bitumen.....like an Awd Subaru. I drove my Triton In this mode every single time it rained especially if I was towing. It’s particularly handy if you’re running a tire that’s not suited to wet bitumen where it gives you a little bit more confidence.
I have an Easy Select, in 4H (Not 4HLC) I'm able to send power to all four wheels and it's super handy in the rain.

I've learnt that 4HLC locks the center diff making all four wheels spin at the exact same time (Splits the torque 50/50
 
#13
I have an Easy Select, in 4H (Not 4HLC) I'm able to send power to all four wheels and it's super handy in the rain.

I've learnt that 4HLC locks the center diff making all four wheels spin at the exact same time (Splits the torque 50/50

Your 4H is the same as 4HLC. I could go into details but it's really not worth confusing people who don't have a understanding of diffs, gearboxes and transfers which I believe might be the case with the poster here and others reading this thread.
 
#14
Hey man, definitely new to the 4x4 action but willing to learn.

Could you explain it just a little bit for me and I'll get a basic understanding plus can watch extra videos and do some research as I have been doing. :)

Cheers mate I'd appreciate it
 
#15
So in easy select when in 4h 50% of the drive is spilt to the front and rear... No questions no compromises. This is fine on any loose surface as the wheels can still spin a different speeds because they're slipping on the surface when your cornering.

In a super select 4hlc is doing the exact same thing and can be used only on loose surfaces.

In super select 4h actually allows the drive between the front and back diffs to vary from 0-100% in either direction depending on which wheels have traction which means it can be used on road all the time. In the real world in this mode you are getting 50% at the front and 50% of the rear but as you turn corners that will vary by a few percent just enough to stop the Driveline binding.

If you want to go off-road and pick a wheel up for example 100% of the power would go to the wheel in the air.
 
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