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Sleeping in a hammock or in a tent?

Discussion in 'Tents' started by Mark Bridges, Jul 14, 2017.

  1. Mark Bridges

    Mark Bridges New Member

    I hate tents. Sleeping is one of life’s great pleasures, but it can also be tortuous, but too many tents have been my torture chamber. Often I experienced a bad night’s sleep due to rocks or tree roots sticking out under our tent. In a hammock you’ll sleep without having to worry about what’s under you. What dou you prefer more?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 15, 2017
  2. GaryM

    GaryM Active Member

    Of the two, I like to lay on my stomach at times so full night in a hammock would be my torture. Although better then sleeping on the front seat of a car. Plus, I dont live near the hammock district.
     
  3. SimonM

    SimonM New Member

    If you get the right camping hammock, you wont sleep better in my opinion. I know people who sleep 24/7 in a hammock even at home. The only issue I have with a hammock is I don't get to use it enough.
     
  4. cam04

    cam04 Active Member

    The only time my chronic back and rib issues will let me punch out 10 hours straight sleep is in my jungle hammock. It is amazing. I have a hiking tent, but will only use it if the hammock isn't suitable which is hardly ever.
     

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    Last edited: Jul 14, 2017
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  5. Albynsw

    Albynsw Well-Known Member

    What is a good one?
     
  6. cam04

    cam04 Active Member

    Hennessy, war bonnet are well known American versions.
    Mine is a mosquito jungle hammock.
    http://www.mosquitohammock.com/
    There are plenty of others. Just don't compare them to a garden hammock.
     
  7. mikehzz

    mikehzz Well-Known Member

    I have a hammock tent. It's a light weight roof tent with an elastic base on my trailer. When set up it's shaped like a hammock. The whole thing weighs in at 17kgs.
     
  8. Kippie

    Kippie Member

    What about falling branches :eek:
     
  9. rogerazz

    rogerazz 4x4 Earth Contributer

    Right now being somewhere around minus two degrees at home, probably a little colder:eek: in the high country here in Vic.
    I currently settle for a double bed, electric blanket on three, one doona, one fleecy top cover and the Missus to keep the cold out.:D
     
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  10. SimonM

    SimonM New Member

    I am completely biased as I make them down here in Tassie but this is ours http://www.tiergear.com.au/11/products/goshawk-camping-hammock.

    The better camping hammocks will be of sufficient length to ensure you can get a pretty flat lay. Depending on your height, a hammock with a length of 3.3m (11ft) will offer much more comfort than shorter hammocks. Most of the really good ones are made by "cottage vendors" in the USA or Tassie;). Most people make the mistake of getting a hammock that is way too short for them.

    The cheaper Chinese made ones can do the job though, but often comfort and durability are less than the cottage made hammocks, though they can be a good way to get into hanging and try a few things out.
     
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  11. Albynsw

    Albynsw Well-Known Member

    You got any pics or a link to what they look like Mike? Sounds interesting
     
  12. Albynsw

    Albynsw Well-Known Member

    Do they make a double version hammock?
     
  13. Hoyks

    Hoyks New Member

    I took a hammock camping once... only once. It was a cheapie and teamed up with a hutchie, so probably not the best setup.
    It wasn't too bad to sleep in as it wasn't too cool, but it rained for 3 days straight and the water dribbled down the ropes and into the netting. Sleeping bag soaked up the water and everything was damp.

    Tents, I got sick of dragging everything out of the vehicle and into the tent and then back again. I had a bad run with self inflating mattresses, so prefer foam as you have to try hard to break it.

    Now, a Roof Top Tent. Nothing sticking into you and no shifting gear around, it all stays in there. Not much good for hiking though.

    I do like these Hennessy one though:
    [​IMG]
    https://theultimatehang.com/2016/05/hennessy-deep-jungle-asym-hammock-review/

    Or one of these massive ones you could have a party in. Not much good in Australia though as a lot of places lack actual trees.

    [​IMG]
    https://www.ippinka.com/blog/tentsile-stingray-tree-tent/
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2017
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  14. mikehzz

    mikehzz Well-Known Member

    I had it on the car then moved it to my trailer instead. It sleeps 2 side by side and is quite comfortable.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
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  15. cam04

    cam04 Active Member

    Just out of interest, what size would a quoll 195 pack down to? I'm assuming the down equivalent will pack smaller but not cope with being wet as well as the synthetic? I am a sea kayaker.
     
  16. cam04

    cam04 Active Member

    You can tie a prussick knot on the tapes out of any left over cord and water will drip off your lines. I did a survival camp back in the '80's and we had those nasty net hammocks and hutchies - I get where you are coming from. The newer gear should have a different name it is so far removed from that.
     
  17. SimonM

    SimonM New Member

    Hey mate - I am an old sea kayaker as well, and I would go with down if pack size is important. Climashield Apex insulation, which is pretty much as good as you can get in synthetic insulation for this purpose, will pack down much larger than down. A -1 synthetic quilt will pack down about the same size as an equivalent -7c down quilt which would be about football size.

    We only use hydrophobic down in our quilts which has much greater resistance to wetting out than untreated down and narrows the gap between synthetic and down for wet environments. Regardless of whether its synthetic or down your sleep will be miserable in either if it gets soaked so I would be double bagging it in a kayak.
     
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  18. GaryM

    GaryM Active Member

    Not fans of dry bags in yaks?
     
  19. SimonM

    SimonM New Member

    Yeah definitely but not all dry bags are fully waterproof. If you have a hatch letting in water and the bag is sitting in that water for a prolonged period some bags will leak. Hence why I would double bag any down gear, possibly being over cautious but it's what I would do.
     
  20. cam04

    cam04 Active Member

    ^^^^ what Simon said. I have a heap of dry bags. They need to be small to fit a kayak shape and also fit through hatches. My down bag fits through my hatches on the valley kayak much better than my synthetic one which catches and has pulled holes in dry bags before. Yes, double bagging sleeping gear is mandatory for me. I get wet, then I get cold, then I get the sads haha. Pic of the kayak and hammock.
     

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