Change background image

Battery Charging correctly

Discussion in 'Electrical' started by Jackolux, Jan 10, 2018.

  1. Jackolux

    Jackolux Active Member

    Ok I have moved this question to a new thread , what about the different charging voltages for batteries the only way would be with a
    DC-DC for in vehicle charging, does it really matter .
    My Dmax shows 14.2 / 14.4V on the ScanGauge when driving .
    I still have the std starting battery under the bonnet of my Dmax and a 100a/h AGM Deep Cycle batt under the tray charging through a Redarc VRS it all seems to work ok .
    My question is about charging with my 240volt Ctek 5amp , 8 stage charger , I connect it to the Ute fairly regularly, why I dunno I just do , it seems like a good idea .
    The Ctek has 4 settings , motorcycle, car , agm and recondition and 8 stages , when I connect it to the AGM Batt I set it to AGM but if I connect it to the start batt what should I set it on because it will close the VRS and charge both Start and AGM batteries , is that ok ? It always goes to the 7th stage , I assume is float after a while .
    What about the recondition stage 8th stage , I have never set it to that , should I and how often ,
    The instructions that came with the Ctek don't really say .
    My Tvan has a Calcium Battery about 75a/h I think , the battery was installed new by the previous owner when I bought the Tvan second hand , how should I charge it when the Tvan is parked up in the garage,
    All 3 are connected when towing , but I only have the one VRS under the Dmax bonnet.
     
  2. drivesafe

    drivesafe Active Member

    Hi Jack, first off, to get the correct charge voltages needed for you batteries, you need to go to each battery’s MANUFACTURER’S website and look up what they recommend for you specific battery.
    NOTE I emphasised MANUFACTURER’S website, do not use the different SELLER’S websites, as these are not reliable sources.

    Next, if you want to charge both batteries at the same time, simply set your charges to AGM and connect to your cranking battery and both batteries will be fully charged.

    Most people misunderstand why different voltages are used, when charging different types of batteries. The voltages used for each battery type is not the MINIMUM voltage required to fully charge that battery type ( which is what most people think the voltage is for ). The voltage level shown for each battery type is actually the MAXIMUM SAFE charging voltage that that battery type can tolerate. So you need to set the battery charge to a level that will not risk overcharging that battery type.

    For example, the maximum safe charge voltage for an Optima Yellowtop battery is 15.1v, but the MANUFACTURER specifically state that their batteries can be FULLY CHARGE with 13.65v.

    So Jack, if you check the manufacturer’s specs for each of your batteries, you will find your alterator’s Operating voltages are perfect for ALL of your batteries.
     
    Tink likes this.
  3. Jackolux

    Jackolux Active Member

    Thanks D-S for that , I haven't looked up the manufacturers voltages , ( I will ) only the listed voltages for say a AGM , Start batt ect
    I did understand the voltages were the max .
    I have been led to believe, mostly by salesman at 4WD shows that are trying sell me something that unless you charge at the correct voltage , I will never fully charge my batteries and eventually they will die prematurely .
     
  4. drivesafe

    drivesafe Active Member

    Hi again Jack and while the claim is actually true, they would have been implying that it only applies to your alternator.

    Well if your driving time meant that you could not fully charge your auxiliary battery, particularly when you have been camping and have used a fair bit of your auxiliary battery’s capacity while you were camping, and then didn’t drive long enough to full recharge your auxiliary battery, when you move to your next camp site. This is commonplace.

    But I bet they didn’t tell you that if you were trying to recharging your battery with the device they were trying to sell you, that your battery would have ended up in an even lower charge state.

    In all fairness to many of these “Box Sellers” ( the product is in one door and out the other ), they can only go on the B/S advertising they are given with these products.

    There is a deliberate lack of information supplied with these devices and it not only leaves the customer misinformed, but most of the sellers are in the same boat.

    As I have posted many, many times, if these wonder devices are so good, why is it that not one of these brands has a graph showing how their wonder device's charging ability compared to how an alternator could charge the same battery.

    They would not dare to produce such a document as it would clearly show, even to the average potential customer, that their wonder device, in the vast majority of setups, did not have a hope of competing with an alternator.
     
  5. Ziggy

    Ziggy Well-Known Member

    I'd highly recommend using the Reco cycle periodically on your aux battery. Disconnect it first.
    It's common for those batteries to get overused/undercharged from the alternator and that reduces their life. Recondition may help restore them.
    I found I was able to get a pair of 3 year old AGMs to regularly take a charge 0.2 V higher after a Reco cycle.
     
  6. Jackolux

    Jackolux Active Member

    What exactly does the reco cycle do that's different ,
     
  7. Ziggy

    Ziggy Well-Known Member

  8. discomatt

    discomatt Well-Known Member

    Probably misinformation by the seller of a charger, the alternator will charge just fine or maybe the amps are too high or to low and the wiring to big or small or maybe different and slower charge rates are good for longevity of the battery whether it be AGM or lithium in a bank of multiple batteries of different size and make with different chemistry on every second battery but the forth battery should be disconnected to let it rest between any bulk charging
    CAPEESH :D:D:D:D:D:D:D
     
  9. Tink

    Tink Well-Known Member

    Don’t be too concerned Jacko. Had AGM batteries for up to 7 years without ever doing a desulfate. Only replaced them as I was doing a remote trip and they were beyond their “average” age.

    http://batteryuniversity.com/learn/article/absorbent_glass_mat_agm
    AGM has very low internal resistance, is capable to deliver high currents on demand and offers a relatively long service life, even when deep cycled. AGM is maintenance free, provides good electrical reliability and is lighter than the flooded lead acid type. While regular lead acid batteries need a topping charge every six months to prevent the buildup of sulfation, AGM batteries are less prone to sulfation and can sit in storage for longer before a charge becomes necessary. The battery stands up well to low temperatures and has a low self-discharge.

    Tink
     
    komaterpillar likes this.
  10. Ziggy

    Ziggy Well-Known Member

  11. Tink

    Tink Well-Known Member

    Thought it was simple. AGM batteries are less prone to sulfation.
    Tink
     
  12. GaryM

    GaryM Well-Known Member

    And perfect example of putting words into their mouths. They like multi stage chargers, even repeated it for the slow readers.

    Catfish?
     
  13. Jackolux

    Jackolux Active Member

    I'm no good to concerned about anything much , after that other tread to DC-DC or not to , I got to thinking about my 3 different types of batteries , I will probably just keep doing what I have been for years, seems to work ok , the Calcium battery that is in the Tvan , I have never had anything to do with one of those before .
    I do regularly keep my batteries topped up with the 240v charger ,
     
    Swaggie likes this.
  14. GaryM

    GaryM Well-Known Member

    What type of calcium battery?

    For start batteries, calcium is just a different make up of the plates, its still a lead acid battery. Calcium is used instead of something else in the alloy that makes up the plates. But they are both still lead plate, acid batteries.

    Low self discharge is a big plus too. Wont discharge as much while sitting dormant, and sulphation is related to cycles.
     
  15. Jackolux

    Jackolux Active Member

    Dunno what type , it's in the batt box on the front of the Tvan , I only run a couple of LED lights and my CPAP machine , maybe charge a couple of phones with the Tvan battery , fridge in in the Ute on the AGM battery .
     
  16. GaryM

    GaryM Well-Known Member

    My understanding is theres confusiion with old school and new. Old alterantors like on a Holden Red motor put out around 13.8v tops when new. That will cause sulphation, and even more so as it ages and voltage drops to say 13.5. Sulphation starts life soft, and can be easily removed by a higher than 14v charge. It sets hard after a time, and needs high current to agitate it. And high Im led to believe is over 20 amps, @ more than 14v.

    New alternators put out mid 14v, and that should be enough to stop sulphation. My alt is putting out 14v, so I will use a smart charger from time to time. An AGM will love 14v and dont like it too much higher. Treat the calcium like any average start battery.

    im an amateur, but its how i read it.


    Edit:
    Just read some stuff re: Calcium. Is it true that he cooler nature of calcium, can lead to layering of the acid? Or would driving keep it agitated enough?
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2018
  17. Tink

    Tink Well-Known Member

    You read it a lot better than some others :)
    Tink
     
  18. discomatt

    discomatt Well-Known Member

    Didn't read something to well, I feel you missed the whole gist of my post but that's OK, it was a piss take on a previous thread NOT to be taken seriously ;)
     
  19. Swaggie

    Swaggie Moderator

    My question here is everyone's trying to get the max life out of your batteries but surely this could kick you back in the ass . Most AGM's have a 3 year warranty .. Even if you get 5 out it isn't that enough, throw it and buy another...

    Surely if your battery is surviving not being choked by sulfation in the first 3 years chances of getting another couple would be very high right.
     
    komaterpillar likes this.
  20. Jackolux

    Jackolux Active Member

    I'm not trying to get max life out of my batteries just want to get the best performance out of them when away on a trip
    Longer life would be a bonus , I have alway just bought a new one if there has been any doubt .
     

Share This Page